Dunn, J. & Harris, I. (eds.)

Locke / edited by John Dunn and Ian Harris. – Cheltenham, UK ; Lyme, US : Edward Elgar, ©1997. – 2 vol. – (Great political thinkers ; 9)

Contents:


Volume 1

Acknowledgements   (p. ix-xi)

Series Preface by the editors   (p. xiii)

Introduction by the editors   (p. xv-xvii)

  1. Herbert D. Foster (1927), “International Calvinism through Locke and the Revolution of 1688,” American historical review, XXXII, 475-99.   (p. 1-25)
  2. M. Oakeshott (1932), “John Locke: born 28 August 1632,” Cambridge review, 54, November 4, 72-73. – (p. 26-27)
  3. N. C. Phillips (1950), “Political philosophy and political fact: the evidence of John Locke,” R. S. Allan (ed.) Liberty and learning: essays in honour of Sir James Hight, Chapter 14, Christchurch: Whitcombe and Tombs, 188-222. – (p. 28-62)
  4. C. B. Macpherson (1954), “The social bearing of Locke’s political theory,” Western political quarterly, VII (1), March, 1-22. – (p. 63-84)
  5. Hans Kelsen (1955), “Foundations of democracy,” Ethics, LXVI, 86-90, ntes from p. 101 (abridged). – (p. 85-89)
  6. Peter Laslett (1956), “The English Revolution and Locke’s Two treatises of government,” Cambridge historical journal, XII (1), 40-55. – (p. 90-105)
  7. John W. Lenz (1956), “Locke’s Essays on the law of nature,” Philosophy and phenomenological research, XVII (1), September, 105-113. – (p. 106-114)
  8. W. Von Leyden (1956), “John Locke and natural law,” Philosophy, XXXI, January, 23-35. – (p. 115-127)
  9. Leo Strauss (1958), “Locke’s doctrine of natural law,” American political science review, LII (2), June, 490-501. – (p. 128-139)
  10. John W. Yolton (1958), “Locke on the law of nature,” Philosophical review, 67, 477-498. – (p. 140-161)
  11. Rosalie L. Colie (1960), “John Locke in the republic of letters,” in J. S. Bromley and E. H. Kossmann (eds.), Britain and the Netherlands, Chapter 6, London: Chatto & Windus, 111-129. – (p. 162-180)
  12. Carlo Augusto Viano (1961), “L’abbozzo originario e gli stadi de composizione di ‘An essay concerning toleration’ e la nascita delle teorie politico-religiose di John Locke,” Rivista di filosofia, LII, 285-311 (in Italian). – (p. 181-207)
  13. Hans Aarsleff (1964), “Leibniz on Locke on language,” Americal philosophical quarterly, 1 (3), July, 165-188. – (p. 208-231)
  14. E. S. De Beer (1966), “John Locke: the appointment offered to him in 1698,” Bulletin of the Institute for Historical Research, XXXIX, 213-219. – (p. 232-238)
  15. David P. Gauthier (1966), “The role of inheritance in Locke’s political theory,” Canadian journal of economics and political science, XXXII (1), February, 38-45. – (p. 239-246)
  16. John Dunn (1967), “Consent in the political theory of John Locke,” Historical journal, X (2), 153-182. – (p. 247-276)
  17. Richard Ashcraft (1969), “Political theory and political reform: John Locke’s Essay on Virginia,” Western political quarterly, XXII (4), December, 742-758. – (p. 277-293)
  18. E. J. Hundert (1972), “The making of homo faber: John Locke between ideology and history,” Journal of the history of ideas, XXXIII (1), January-March, 3-22. – (p. 294-313)
  19. Karl Olivecrona (1974), “Appropriation in the state of nature: Locke on the origins of property,” Journal of the history of ideas, XXXV (2), 211-230. – (p. 314-333)
  20. Karl Olivecrona (1974), “Locke’s theory of appropriation,” Philosophical quarterly 24 (96), July, 220-234. – (p. 334-348)
  21. E. J. Hundert (1977), “Market society and meaning in Locke’s political philosophy,” E.J. Hundert. // IN: Journal of the history of philosophy, XV (1), January, 33-44. – (p. 349-360)
  22. J. T. Moore (1978), “Locke on assent and toleration,” Journal of religion, 58 (1), January, 30-36. – (p. 361-367)
  23. Mary Lyndon Shanley (1979), “Marriage contract and social contract in seventeenth century English political thought,” Western political quarterly, XXXII (1), March, 79-91. – (p. 368-380)
  24. James Tully (1979), “The framework of natural rights in Locke’s analysis of property: a contextual reconstruction,” in Anthony Parel and Thomas Flanagan (eds.), Theories of property: Aristotle to the present, Waterloo, Ont.: Wilfred Laurier University Press, 114-138. – (p. 381-405)
  25. Richard Ashcraft (1980), “Revolutionary politics and Locke’s Two treatises of government: radicalism and Lockean political theory,” Political theory, 8 (4), November, 429-486. – (p. 406-463)
  26. Richard Rorty (1980), “Locke’s confusion of explanation with justification,” Philosophy and the mirror of nature, Chapter 3.2, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 139-148. – (p. 464-473)
  27. John Dunn (1981), “Individuality and clientage in the formation of Locke’s social imagination,” in Reinhard Brandt (ed.), John Locke: Symposium Wolfenbüttel 1979, Berlin :Walter de Gruyter, 43-73. – (p. 474-504)
  28. G. A. J. Rogers (1981), “Locke, law and the laws of nature,” in Reinhard Brandt (ed.), John Locke: Symposium Wolfenbüttel 1979, Berlin :Walter de Gruyter, 146-162. – (p. 505-521)
  29. Charles D. Tarlton (1981), “The Exclusion Controversy, pamphleteering, and Locke’s Two treatises,” Historical journal, XXIV (1), 49-68. – (p. 522-541)
  30. J. J. Waldron (1981), “Locke’s account of inheritance and bequest,” Journal of the history of philosophy, 19, 39-51. – (p. 542-554)
  31. J. L. Mackie (1982), Review of James Tully, A discourse of property: John Locke and his adversaries, Philosophical quarterly, 32 (126), January, 91-94. – (p. 555-558)
  32. Geraint Parry (1982), “Locke on representation in politics,” History of European ideas, 3 (4), 403-414. – (p. 559-570)
  33. Andrew Reeve (1982), “Political obligation and the strict settlement,” Locke newsletter, 13, 47-55. – (p. 571-579)

Name Index   (p. 581-591)


Volume 2

Acknowledgements   (p. vii-viii)

  1. J. H. Burns (1983), Ius gladii and jurisdictio: Jacques Almain and John Locke,” Historical journal, 26 (2), 369-374. – (p. 1-6)
  2. Francesco Fagiani (1983), “Natural law and history in Locke’s theory of distributive justice,” Topoi, 2, 163-185. – (p. 7-29)
  3. A. John Simmons (1983), “Inalienable rights and Locke’s Treatises,” Philosophy & public affairs, 12 (3), Summer, 175-204. – (p. 30-59)
  4. James Tully (1984), “Locke on liberty,” in Zbigniew Pelczynski and John Gray (eds.), Conceptions of liberty in political philosophy, Chapter 4, New York: Athlone Press, 57-82. – (p. 60-85)
  5. G. A. Cohen (1985), “Marx and Locke on land and labour,” Proceedings of the British Academy, LXXI, 357-388. – (p. 86-117)
  6. John Dunn (1985), “ ‘Trust’ in the politics of John Locke,” Rethinking modern political theory: essays, 1979-83, Chapter 2, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 34-54. – (p. 118-138)
  7. Joshua Cohen (1986), “Structure, choice, and legitimacy: Locke’s theory of the state,” Philosophy & public affairs, 15 (4), Fall, 301-324. – (p. 139-162)
  8. A. L. Beier (1988), “ ‘Utter strangers to industry, morality and religion’ : John Locke on the poor,” Eighteenth-century life, 12 (3), November, 28-41. – (p. 163-176)
  9. Jeffrey Friedman (1988), “Locke as politician,” Critical review, 2 (2-3), Spring/Summer, 64-101. – (p. 177-214)
  10. Patrick Kelly (1988), “ ‘All things richly to enjoy’: economics and politics in Locke’s Two treatises of government,” Political studies, XXXVI, 273-293. – (p. 215-235)
  11. J. G. A. Pocock (1988), “The fourth English civil war : dissolution, desertion and alternative histories in the Glorious Revolution,” Government and opposition, 23, 151-166. – (p. 236-251)
  12. David C. Snyder (1988), “John Locke and the freedom of belief,” Journal of church and state, 30 (2), Spring, 227-243. – (p. 252-268)
  13. Martyn P. Thompson (1988), “Significant silences in Locke’s Two treatises of government: constitutional history, contract and law,” Historical journal, 31 (2), 275-294. – (p. 269-288)
  14. James Tully (1988), “Governing conduct,” in Edmund Leites (ed.), Conscience and casuistry in early modern Europe, Chapter 1, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 12-71. – (p. 289-348)
  15. Jeremy Waldron (1988), “Locke: toleration and the rationality of persecution,” in Susan Mendus (ed.), Justifying toleration: conceptual and historical perspectives, Chapter 3, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 61-86. – (p. 349-374)
  16. Gordon J. Schochet (1989), “Radical politics and Ashcraft’s treatise on Locke,” Journal of the history of ideas, L (3), 491-510. – (p. 375-394)
  17. A. John Simmons (1989), “Locke’s state of nature,” Political theory, 17 (3), August, 449-470. – (p. 395-416)
  18. Jeremy Waldron (1989), “John Locke: social contract versus political anthropology,” Review of politics, 51 (1), Winter, 3-28. – (p. 417-442)
  19. John Dunn (1990), “What is living and what is dead in the political theory of John Locke?”, Interpreting political responsibility: essays 1981-1989, Chapter 2, Cambridge: Polity, 9-25 and 217-220. – (p. 443-462)
  20. J. R. Milton (1990), “John Locke and the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina,” Locke newsletter, 21, 111-133. – (p. 463-485)
  21. Helen Pringle (1990), “Locke’s political sympathies: some unnoticed evidence,” Locke newsletter, 21, 135-140. – (p. 486-491)
  22. Lois G. Schwoerer (1990), “Locke, Lockean ideas, and the Glorious Revolution,” Journal of the history of ideas, LI (4), 531-548. – (p. 492-509)
  23. John Dunn (1991), “The claim to freedom of conscience : freedom of speech, freedom of thought, freedom of worship?”, in Ole Peter Grell, Jonathan I. Israel and Nicholas Tyacke (eds.), From persecution to toleration: the Glorious Revolution and religion in England, Chapter 7, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 171-193. – (p. 510-532)
  24. David Wootton (1992), “John Locke and Richard Ashcraft’s Revolutionary politics,” Political studies, XL (1), March, 79-98. – (p. 533-552)
  25. Richard Ashcraft (1992), “Simple objections and complex reality: theorizing political radicalism in seventeenth-century England,” Political studies, XL, 99-115. – (p. 553-569)
  26. Ellen Meiksins Wood (1992), “Locke against democracy: consent, representation and suffrage in the Two treatises,” History of political thought, XIII (4), Winter, 659-689. – (p. 570-605)

Name Index   (p. 607-616)