“The Encantadas”

Title“The Encantadas”
Year for Search1854
Authors[Melville], [Herman](1819-1891)
Tertiary AuthorsTarnmoor, Salvator R. [pseud.]
Secondary TitlePutnam’s Monthly Magazine
Volume / Edition3.15 - 17
Pagination311-31, 345-355, 460-466
Date PublishedApril - June 1854
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

See Jonathan Beecher, Variations on a Dystopian Theme: Melville’s ‘Encantadas’.” Utopian Studies 11.2 (2000): 88-95, who says “The Encantadas” “presents an image of nature as a wasteland utterly inhospitable to human purposes, of human beings as either predators of victims, and of existence as so painful that endurance is the sole virtue” (90).

Additional Publishers

Rpt. in The Piazza Tales (New York: Dix & Edwards/London: Sampson Low, Son & Co., 1856), 287-400; separately in a limited edition of 550 copies. Burlingame, CA: William P. Wreden, 1940; and in The Writings of Herman Melville. The Northwestern-Newberry Library Edition. Volume 9. The Piazza Tales Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860. Ed. Harrison Hayford (Evanston, IL/Chicago, IL: Northwestern University Press and the Newberry Library, 1987), 125-173, with “Notes on ‘The Encantadas’” (600-617.

Pseudonym

Salvator R. Tarnmoor [pseud.].

Holding Institutions

PSt

Author Note

(1819-1891)

Full Text

1854 [Melville, Herman] (1819-1891). “The Encantadas.” By Salvator R. Tarnmoor [pseud.]. Putnam’s Monthly Magazine 3.15 - 17 (April - June 1854): 311-31, 345-355, 460-466. Rpt. in The Piazza Tales (New York: Dix & Edwards/London: Sampson Low, Son & Co., 1856), 287-400; separately in a limited edition of 550 copies. Burlingame, CA: William P. Wreden, 1940; and in The Writings of Herman Melville. The Northwestern-Newberry Library Edition. Volume 9. The Piazza Tales Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860. Ed. Harrison Hayford (Evanston, IL/Chicago, IL: Northwestern University Press and the Newberry Library, 1987), 125-173, with “Notes on ‘The Encantadas’” (600-617. PSt

See Jonathan Beecher, Variations on a Dystopian Theme: Melville’s ‘Encantadas’.” Utopian Studies 11.2 (2000): 88-95, who says “The Encantadas” “presents an image of nature as a wasteland utterly inhospitable to human purposes, of human beings as either predators of victims, and of existence as so painful that endurance is the sole virtue” (90).