“The Evening and the Morning and the Night”

Title“The Evening and the Morning and the Night”
Year for Search1987
AuthorsButler, Octavia E[stelle](1947-2006)
Secondary TitleOmni Magazine
Volume / Edition9.8
Pagination56, 62, 108, 110, 113, 116, 118, 120
Date PublishedMay 1987
KeywordsAfrican-American author, Female author
Annotation

Dystopia. The story concerns a disease that causes people to violently kill themselves and the discovery of a way to mitigate the effects through made possible by a genetic abnormality in some women. The dystopia is the way that society treats those with the disease, which is to isolate and exclude them, which can be read as a metaphor for the way society treats various classes of “others”. 

Additional Publishers

Rpt. in her Bloodchild and Other Stories (New York: Four Walls Eight Windows, 1995), 33-84 with an “Afterword” on 85; in Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora. Ed. Sheree R. Thomas (New York: Warner Books, 2000), 171-95 with the “Afterword” on 195-96; and in People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction! Ed. Nalo Hopkinson and Kristine Ong Muslin Special Issue of Lightspeed, no. 73 (June 2016): 200-18

Holding Institutions

PSt

Author Note

African-American female author (1947-2006)

Full Text

1987 Butler, Octavia E[stelle] (1947-2006). “The Evening and the Morning and the Night.” Omni Magazine 9.8 (May 1987): 56, 62, 108, 110, 113, 116, 118, 120. Rpt. in her Bloodchild and Other Stories (New York: Four Walls Eight Windows, 1995), 33-84 with an “Afterword” on 85; in Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora. Ed. Sheree R. Thomas (New York: Warner Books, 2000), 171-95 with the “Afterword” on 195-96; and in People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction! Ed. Nalo Hopkinson and Kristine Ong Muslin Special Issue of Lightspeed, no. 73 (June 2016): 200-18. PSt

Dystopia. The story concerns a disease that causes people to violently kill themselves and the discovery of a way to mitigate the effects through made possible by a genetic abnormality in some women. The dystopia is the way that society treats those with the disease, which is to isolate and exclude them, which can be read as a metaphor for the way society treats various classes of “others”. African-American female author.