“Charlottesville: A Fictional Account”

Title“Charlottesville: A Fictional Account”
Year for Search1979
AuthorsRandall, Nan
Secondary TitleThe Effects of Nuclear War
Pagination124-38
Date Published1979
PublisherOffice of Technological Assessment, Congress of the United States
Place PublishedWashington, DC
KeywordsFemale author, US author
Annotation

A day by day account of the effects of nuclear war on Charlottesville, Virginia. The story provided the basis for the television film The Day After (1983) written by Edward Hume (b. 1936) and directed by Nicholas Meyer (b. 1945).The author had written with William Kincade (1939-2017), the executive director of the Arms Control Association, a series describing the effect of two nuclear bombs dropped on the Tampa Bay area. See “Doomsday.” St. Petersburg Times (February 25-28, 1979): 1A, 20A; 1A, 13A-14A; 1A, 7A; 12A.  For background to the story, see Alexis C. Madrigal, “The People Who Would Survive Nuclear War.” The Atlantic.com (January 25, 2018). https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/01/that-time-the-government-commission-fiction-about-nuclear-war/551303/

Info Notes

OTA-NS-89 

Holding Institutions

Hathi

Author Note

The female author was a journalist who wrote for The Washington Post and Newsweek, who had previously worked on nuclear stories with the executive director of the Arms Control Association, and who had been program director of the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy.

Full Text

1979 Randall, Nan. “Charlottesville: A Fictional Account.” In The Effects of Nuclear War (Washington, DC: Office of Technological Assessment, Congress of the United States, 1979), 124-38. OTA-NS-89 Hathi

A day by day account of the effects of nuclear war on Charlottesville, Virginia. The story provided the basis for the television film The Day After (1983) written by Edward Hume (b. 1936) and directed by Nicholas Meyer (b. 1945). The female author was a journalist who wrote for The Washington Post and Newsweek, who had previously worked on nuclear stories with the executive director of the Arms Control Association, and who had been program director of the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy. She had written with William Kincade (1939-2017), the executive director of the Arms Control Association, a series describing the effect of two nuclear bombs dropped on the Tampa Bay area. See “Doomsday.” St. Petersburg Times (February 25-28, 1979): 1A, 20A; 1A, 13A-14A; 1A, 7A; 12A.  For background to the story, see Alexis C. Madrigal, “The People Who Would Survive Nuclear War.” The Atlantic.com (January 25, 2018). https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/01/that-time-the-government-commission-fiction-about-nuclear-war/551303/