2006: 20 Stories of Life, Love and Death on the Roads early in the 21st Century as seen by young writers ten years earlier

Title2006: 20 Stories of Life, Love and Death on the Roads early in the 21st Century as seen by young writers ten years earlier
Year for Search1996
Secondary AuthorsDoyle, Martin
Date Published1996
PublisherNew Zealand Police
Place PublishedWellington, New Zealand
KeywordsAotearoa/New Zealand author, Female author, Male author
Annotation

Chosen from stories submitted by forty-seven schools plus one by [Anthony] Phillip Mann, who selected the ones published. Although individually none of these mostly very short pieces have enough detail to warrant inclusion, collectively they provide glimpses of both eutopias and dystopias concerned with road safety. Two approaches dominate, technological solutions that take control away from drivers and harsh punishment, including death, particularly for drunk driving.

Info Notes

The contents include V. Hennings, “The Change of the Code” [poem] (1-2); Chris Kerr, “Sensor City” (3-4); Bruce Lamont, “Road Safety in the Year 2000” (5-7); Angela Bycroft, “Only in Time” (8-12); Helen Tapper, “My Mark on Society” (13-15); Melanie Hayes, “Worlds Apart” (16-19); Helen Clark, “The Crying Man” (20-21); Emma Walker, “The Light” (22-23); Luke S. Williams, “Disaster on Route 15 (24-28); Michael Robertson, “Little Red Button” (29-31); Anna Ekins, “Another C. O. D. Tragedy” (32-34); Anna Tsukigawa, “Everyone Has the Right to Live?” (35-36); Carolyn Sim, “Some Things Will Always Stay the Same” (37-39); Andrew Bryenton, “A Re-run of the Tragedy” (40-42); Saeeda Verrall, “High Spirits” (43-45); Melanie Harris, “Wasted” (46-49); Andrew Cushen, “Reverse Spin” (50-52); Jane Gilkison, “Reflections” (53-55); Alex Pasley, “Virtual Termination” (56-59); and [Anthony] Phillip Mann, “Coming to Terms” (60-68).

Holding Institutions

ATL

Full Text

1996 2006: 20 Stories of Life, Love and Death on the Roads early in the 21st Century as seen by young writers ten years earlier. Ed. Martin Doyle. Wellington, New Zealand: New Zealand Police. The contents include V. Hennings, “The Change of the Code” [poem] (1-2); Chris Kerr, “Sensor City” (3-4); Bruce Lamont, “Road Safety in the Year 2000” (5-7); Angela Bycroft, “Only in Time” (8-12); Helen Tapper, “My Mark on Society” (13-15); Melanie Hayes, “Worlds Apart” (16-19); Helen Clark, “The Crying Man” (20-21); Emma Walker, “The Light” (22-23); Luke S. Williams, “Disaster on Route 15 (24-28); Michael Robertson, “Little Red Button” (29-31); Anna Ekins, “Another C. O. D. Tragedy” (32-34); Anna Tsukigawa, “Everyone Has the Right to Live?” (35-36); Carolyn Sim, “Some Things Will Always Stay the Same” (37-39); Andrew Bryenton, “A Re-run of the Tragedy” (40-42); Saeeda Verrall, “High Spirits” (43-45); Melanie Harris, “Wasted” (46-49); Andrew Cushen, “Reverse Spin” (50-52); Jane Gilkison, “Reflections” (53-55); Alex Pasley, “Virtual Termination” (56-59); and [Anthony] Phillip Mann, “Coming to Terms” (60-68). ATL

Chosen from stories submitted by forty-seven schools plus one by [Anthony] Phillip Mann, who selected the ones published. Although individually none of these mostly very short pieces have enough detail to warrant inclusion, collectively they provide glimpses of both eutopias and dystopias concerned with road safety. Two approaches dominate, technological solutions that take control away from drivers and harsh punishment, including death, particularly for drunk driving. New Zealand authors.