The Adventures, and Surprizing Deliverances, of James Dubourdieu, and His Wife: Who were taken by Pyrates, and carried to the Uninhabited-Part of the Isle of Paradise. Containing A Description of that Country, its Laws, Religion and Customs: Of Their being at last releas'd; and how they came to Paris, where they are still living. Also, The Adventures of Alexander Vendchurch, Whose Ship's Crew Rebelled against him, and set him on Shore of an Island in the South-Sea, where he liv'd five Years, five Months, and seven Days; and was at last providentially releas'd by a Jamaica Ship. Written by Himself

TitleThe Adventures, and Surprizing Deliverances, of James Dubourdieu, and His Wife: Who were taken by Pyrates, and carried to the Uninhabited-Part of the Isle of Paradise. Containing A Description of that Country, its Laws, Religion and Customs: Of Their being at last releas'd; and how they came to Paris, where they are still living. Also, The Adventures of Alexander Vendchurch, Whose Ship's Crew Rebelled against him, and set him on Shore of an Island in the South-Sea, where he liv'd five Years, five Months, and seven Days; and was at last providentially releas'd by a Jamaica Ship. Written by Himself
Year for Search1719
Authors[Evans], [Ambrose]
Date Published1719
PublisherPtd. by J. Bettenham; C. Rivington; J. Brotherton and W. Meadows; A. Dodd; and W. Charwood
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsMale author
Annotation

The first is a eutopia. The people go nude and are very healthy. No government, although elders get respect and deference. Monogamous and the marriage ceremony is described in detail. No private property, and there is no source of wealth. Religious and the people see every day as service to God. They believe that God has imprinted the law in people and reason is the guide to those laws. Reject Christianity when told of it. Spend their time tending the plants and trees, from which they get their food and create their buildings (from the living plants), singing and dancing, and raising their children. Do not understand the concept of gain or riches. “How happy we are, who want nothing that’s necessary to life, nor have any desires or wishes for what we do not want” (78/Claeys 83). The second is an adventure and romance story which ends with the separated couple being abandoned on the same island and creating a brief lover’s eutopia.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. in Modern British Utopias 1700-1850. Ed. Gregory Claeys. 8 vols. (London: Pickering & Chatto, 1997), 1: 47-111 with the items on 51-93 and 95-111.

Info Notes

The items are separately paged with a separate, slightly different, title page, “The Lives, Adventures and Wonderful Deliverances of Mrs. Rattenburg, and James Dubourdieu” and “The Adventures of Alexander Vendchurch, and of His Ships Crew Rebelling against him, and setting him on shore in an Island in the South-Sea, &c. “

See Lucius L. Hubbard, Notes on the adventures and Surprizing Deliverances of James Dubourdieu and His Wife. A Source for Gulliver’s Travels: Also The Adventures of Alexander Vendchurch [London 1719]. [Ann Arbor, MI]: Ann Arbor Press, 1927.

Holding Institutions

ICN

Full Text

1719 [Evans, Ambrose]. The Adventures, and Surprizing Deliverances, of James Dubourdieu, and His Wife: Who were taken by Pyrates, and carried to the Uninhabited-Part of the Isle of Paradise. Containing A Description of that Country, its Laws, Religion and Customs: Of Their being at last releas’d; and how they came to Paris, where they are still living. Also, The Adventures of Alexander Vendchurch, Whose Ship’s Crew Rebelled against him, and set him on Shore of an Island in the South-Sea, where he liv’d five Years, five Months, and seven Days; and was at last providentially releas’d by a Jamaica Ship. Written by Himself. London: Ptd. by J. Bettenham; C. Rivington; J. Brotherton and W. Meadows; A. Dodd; and W. Charwood. The items are separately paged with a separate, slightly different, title page, “The Lives, Adventures and Wonderful Deliverances of Mrs. Rattenburg, and James Dubourdieu” and “The Adventures of Alexander Vendchurch, and of His Ships Crew Rebelling against him, and setting him on shore in an Island in the South-Sea, &c.” Rpt. in Modern British Utopias 1700-1850. Ed. Gregory Claeys. 8 vols. (London: Pickering & Chatto, 1997), 1: 47-111 with the items on 51-93 and 95-111. See Lucius L. Hubbard, Notes on the adventures and Surprizing Deliverances of James Dubourdieu and His Wife. A Source for Gulliver’s Travels: Also The Adventures of Alexander Vendchurch [London 1719]. [Ann Arbor, MI]: Ann Arbor Press, 1927. ICN

The first is a eutopia. The people go nude and are very healthy. No government, although elders get respect and deference. Monogamous and the marriage ceremony is described in detail. No private property, and there is no source of wealth. Religious and the people see every day as service to God. They believe that God has imprinted the law in people and reason is the guide to those laws. Reject Christianity when told of it. Spend their time tending the plants and trees, from which they get their food and create their buildings (from the living plants), singing and dancing, and raising their children. Do not understand the concept of gain or riches. “How happy we are, who want nothing that’s necessary to life, nor have any desires or wishes for what we do not want” (78/Claeys 83). The second is an adventure and romance story which ends with the separated couple being abandoned on the same island and creating a brief lover’s eutopia.