The Anatomie of Abuses: Contayning a Discoverie, or Briefe Summarie of such Notable Vices and Imperfections, as now raigne in many Christian Countreyes of the Worlde: but (especiallie) in a verie famous ILANDE called AILGNA: Together, with most fearefull Examples of Gods Iudgements, executed vpon the wicked for the same, aswell in AILGNA of late, as in other places, elsewhere. Verie Godly, to be read of all true Christians euerie where: but most needefull to be regarded in ENGLANDE

TitleThe Anatomie of Abuses: Contayning a Discoverie, or Briefe Summarie of such Notable Vices and Imperfections, as now raigne in many Christian Countreyes of the Worlde: but (especiallie) in a verie famous ILANDE called AILGNA: Together, with most fearefull Examples of Gods Iudgements, executed vpon the wicked for the same, aswell in AILGNA of late, as in other places, elsewhere. Verie Godly, to be read of all true Christians euerie where: but most needefull to be regarded in ENGLANDE
Year for Search1583
AuthorsStubbes, Phillip (c. 1555 – c. 1610)
Date Published1583
PublisherRichard Iones
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

Satire on England using the imaginary country approach. Stubbes begins his attack by focusing on pride and a lengthy critique of the clothes worn by both men and women. He then moves on to sexual relations, eating and drinking, usury, Sabbath-breaking, and other topics. Generally read as anti-theatre. See also 1583 Stubbes. The Second part.

Additional Publishers

This ed. was published May 1 with a variant issue dated May 29. A 2nd ed. was published August 16 and a 3rd ed. on October 12, 1584, with a variant issue of the 3rd in 1585, all with minor variations in the title. The 4th and final ed. eliminates the pretense of the book being about an imaginary country, and is entitled The Anatomie of Abuses. Containing A Description of such notable Vices, as raigne in many Countries of the world, but especiallie in the Realme of England: Together with most fearefull examples of Gods heauie Iudgements inflicted vpon the wicked for the same as well in England of late, as in other places else where. Verie godly to be read by all true Christians euery where, but most chiefly, to bee regarded in England. Made dialogue-wise by Phillip Stubs, Gent. Now, the fourth time, newly corrected and enlarged by the same Author. London: Imprinted by Richard Iones, 1595. Rpt. as Phillip Stubbes’s Anatomy of the Abuses in England in Shakespere’s Youth, A. D. 1583. Part I. (Collated with Other Editions in 1583, 1585, and 1595.) With Extracts from Stubbes’s Life of His Wife, 1591, and his Perfect Pathway to Felicitie, 1592 (1610), and B. P. Babington on the Ten Commandments, 1588; also the Fourth Book of Thomas Kirchmaier’s (or Naogeorgus’s) Regnum Papismi, or Popish Kingdome, (Englisht by Barnabe Googe, 1570,) on Popular and Popish Superstitions in 1553. Ed. Frederick J. Furnivall. London: Publisht for The New Shakespeare Society by N. Trübner & Co., 1877-9 (LLL); and Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum/New York: Da Capo Press, 1972. A critical ed. of the 4th ed. was published ed. Margaret Jane Kidnie. Tempe, AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in conjunction with Renaissance English Text Society, 2002.

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Author Note

(c. 1555 – c. 1610)

Full Text

1583 Stubbes, Phillip. The Anatomie of Abuses: Contayning a Discoverie, or Briefe Summarie of such Notable Vices and Imperfections, as now raigne in many Christian Countreyes of the Worlde: but (especiallie) in a verie famous ILANDE called AILGNA: Together, with most fearefull Examples of Gods Iudgements, executed vpon the wicked for the same, aswell in AILGNA of late, as in other places, elsewhere. Verie Godly, to be read of all true Christians euerie where: but most needefull to be regarded in ENGLANDE. Made dialogue-wise, by Phillip Stubbes. London: Richard Iones. This ed. was published May 1 and was rpt. ed. John Payne Collier. London, 1870, with an “Introduction by the editor (i-ii); and New York: Garland, 1973, with an “Introduction” by Andrew Freeman. A variant issue dated May 29. A 2nd ed. was published August 16 and a 3rd ed. on October 12, 1584, with a variant issue of the 3rd in 1585, all with minor variations in the title. The 1585 ed. was rpt. as The anatomie of abuses by Philip Stubbes; reprinted from the third edition of 1585 under the superintendence of William B. D. D. Turnbull. London: W. Pickering, 1836. with “Prefatory Remarks” by Turnbull (v-xi). The 4th and final ed. eliminates the pretense of the book being about an imaginary country, and is entitled The Anatomie of Abuses. Containing A Description of such notable Vices, as raigne in many Countries of the world, but especiallie in the Realme of England: Together with most fearefull examples of Gods heauie Iudgements inflicted vpon the wicked for the same as well in England of late, as in other places else where. Verie godly to be read by all true Christians euery where, but most chiefly, to bee regarded in England. Made dialogue-wise by Phillip Stubs, Gent. Now, the fourth time, newly corrected and enlarged by the same Author. London: Imprinted by Richard Iones, 1595. Rpt. as Phillip Stubbes’s Anatomy of the Abuses in England in Shakespere’s Youth, A. D. 1583. Part I. (Collated with Other Editions in 1583, 1585, and 1595.) With Extracts from Stubbes’s Life of His Wife, 1591, and his Perfect Pathway to Felicitie, 1592 (1610), and B. P. Babington on the Ten Commandments, 1588; also the Fourth Book of Thomas Kirchmaier’s (or Naogeorgus’s) Regnum Papismi, or Popish Kingdome, (Englisht by Barnabe Googe, 1570,) on Popular and Popish Superstitions in 1553. Ed. Frederick J. Furnivall. London: Publisht for The New Shakespeare Society by N. Trübner & Co., 1877-9 (LLL); and Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum/New York: Da Capo Press, 1972. A critical ed. of the 4th ed. was published ed. Margaret Jane Kidnie. Tempe, AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in conjunction with Renaissance English Text Society, 2002. Hathi, HRC, L, LLL, O

Satire on England using the imaginary country approach. Stubbes begins his attack by focusing on pride and a lengthy critique of the clothes worn by both men and women. He then moves on to sexual relations, eating and drinking, usury, Sabbath-breaking, and other topics. Generally read as anti-theatre. See also 1583 Stubbes. The Second part.