Articles and orders, made and agreed upon the 9th day of July, 1647 and in the three and twentieth year of the raign of our soveraign Lord Charles, by the grace of God, King of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, &c.

TitleArticles and orders, made and agreed upon the 9th day of July, 1647 and in the three and twentieth year of the raign of our soveraign Lord Charles, by the grace of God, King of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, &c.
Year for Search1647
AuthorsCompany of Adventurers for the Plantation of the Islands of Eleutheria, formerly called Buhama in America,
Pagination1 p. broadside
Date Published1647
Publisher[London]
Place Published[Np]
Annotation

Proposal for a colony with no differences over religion. Each of the first one hundred Adventurers, as they are called, will receive three hundred acres, and later another two thousand acres. After they have served their term, servants will be given twenty-five acres. Inhabitants are to treat the natives well, and any natives who had been enslaved and sold to another island were to be purchased, returned, and freed. In addition, there are details on aspects of the economy and the political system.

Holding Institutions

L, Wing C5583

Full Text

1647 Company of Adventurers for the Plantation of the Islands of Eleutheria, formerly called Buhama in America. Articles and orders, made and agreed upon the 9th day of July, 1647 and in the three and twentieth year of the raign of our soveraign Lord Charles, by the grace of God, King of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, &c. By the Company of Adventurers for the Plantation of the Islands of Eleutheria, formerly called Buhama in America, and the adjacent islands to be observed and by all and singular adventurers, to planters and dwellers upon, and all resiants [sic] at the same islands. [London, np]. 1 pp. broadside. L, Wing C5583

Proposal for a colony with no differences over religion. Each of the first one hundred Adventurers, as they are called, will receive three hundred acres, and later another two thousand acres. After they have served their term, servants will be given twenty-five acres. Inhabitants are to treat the natives well, and any natives who had been enslaved and sold to another island were to be purchased, returned, and freed. In addition, there are details on aspects of the economy and the political system.