Blind: The Story of the World Tragedy

TitleBlind: The Story of the World Tragedy
Year for Search1934
AuthorsMcMasters, William H[enry](1874-1968)
Pagination218 pp.
Date Published1934
PublisherStratford Co.
Place PublishedBoston, MA
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

The novel is presented as a history of “the greatest tragedy that ever befell humanity” and “the reclamation and re-organization problems that developed from it” ([vii]) during which, passing through the tail of a comet in 1950 everyone on Earth became instantly blind. The blindness only last twenty-one days, and there is widespread destruction, all but around five percent of the world's population die, and the survivors are mostly starving. The focus of the novel, though, is on the recovery in which, under the leadership of MacKenzie, the general welfare of the entire population is the mantra, and a worldwide eutopia of equality emerges. Stress on the role of women in the recovery. Various racist comments regarding Blacks.

Info Notes

MacKenzie is the protagonist who is writing the history of the tragedy in 1955. In 2022 Forgotten Books published a reprint with MacKenzie as the author, and a number of other sources make the same mistake.

Holding Institutions

InU

Author Note

The author (1874-1968) is best known as the journalist who exposed the scheme of Charles Ponzi (1882-1949) that gave the name to a form of fraud.

Full Text

1934 McMasters, William H[enry] (1874-1968). Blind: The Story of the World Tragedy by David Glenn MacKenzie As seen through the eyes of William H. Masters. Boston, MA: Stratford Co. 218 pp. MacKenzie is the protagonist who is writing the history of the tragedy in 1955. In 2022 Forgotten Books published a reprint with MacKenzie as the author, and a number of other sources make the same mistake. InU

The novel is presented as a history of “the greatest tragedy that ever befell humanity” and “the reclamation and re-organization problems that developed from it” ([vii]) during which, passing through the tail of a comet in 1950 everyone on Earth became instantly blind. The blindness only last twenty-one days, and there is widespread destruction, all but around five percent of the world's population die, and the survivors are mostly starving. The focus of the novel, though, is on the recovery in which, under the leadership of MacKenzie, the general welfare of the entire population is the mantra, and a worldwide eutopia of equality emerges. Stress on the role of women in the recovery. Various racist comments regarding Blacks. The author is best known as the journalist who exposed the scheme of Charles Ponzi (1882-1949) that gave the name to a form of fraud.