The Bride of Christ. A Message from Jerusalem to the True and Faithful Subjects of Jesus Christ throughout the World

TitleThe Bride of Christ. A Message from Jerusalem to the True and Faithful Subjects of Jesus Christ throughout the World
Year for Search1923
AuthorsDavis, Emry
Date Published[1923]
PublisherThe Palestine Press
Place PublishedJerusalem
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

Religious eutopia (primarily for Baptists) in which Jerusalem is restored to its former state but is now for Christians. Detailed reforms, including abolishing interest, dividends, rent, and high salaries and fees. Uniform wage of five dollars a day. Provides a constitution consisting of the Old Testament, the New Testament, and new rules and regulations. Racist. See his Introductory Edition to The Bride of Christ and a Message from Jerusalem. Jerusalem, (Palestine) and New York: The Palestine Press, nd (CtY), where he argues that Anglo-Saxons, and Baptists in particular, are the ten lost tribes and blood descendants of Israel but specifically rejects the argument that the British Empire is the new Israel.

Info Notes

See also 1925 Willoughby.

Holding Institutions

CtY, MH

Author Note

The author was born in Busti, NY and having invented an ink-preserving inkstand, he developed this into a successful business headquartered in New York City. Information from Thomas English, a descendant.

Full Text

[1923] Davis, Emry. The Bride of Christ. A Message from Jerusalem to the True and Faithful Subjects of Jesus Christ throughout the World. Jerusalem: The Palestine Press. CtY, MH

Religious eutopia (primarily for Baptists) in which Jerusalem is restored to its former state but is now for Christians. Detailed reforms, including abolishing interest, dividends, rent, and high salaries and fees. Uniform wage of five dollars a day. Provides a constitution consisting of the Old Testament, the New Testament, and new rules and regulations. Racist. See his Introductory Edition to The Bride of Christ and a Message from Jerusalem. Jerusalem, (Palestine) and New York: The Palestine Press, nd (CtY), where he argues that Anglo-Saxons, and Baptists in particular, are the ten lost tribes and blood descendants of Israel but specifically rejects the argument that the British Empire is the new Israel. Nationality of the author uncertain but probably U.S. See also 1925 Willoughby.