The Captive of the Castle of Sennaar: An African Tale Containing Various Anecdotes of the Sophians Hitherto Unknown To Mankind in General

TitleThe Captive of the Castle of Sennaar: An African Tale Containing Various Anecdotes of the Sophians Hitherto Unknown To Mankind in General
Year for Search1798
AuthorsCumberland, George(1754-1848)
Date Published1798
PublisherPtd. for the author
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

Two lost race eutopias in central Africa. The first, presented in the 1798 and 1810 editions, is peopled with Greek sun-worshippers. These people, the Sophians, are art lovers, Deists, have gender equality, and racial, religious and ethnic toleration. The second, presented in the second part first published in 1991, are Christians. These people, the Jovinians, have no art and proselytize their failure simple form of Protestantism and practice a general community of goods. They recognize the importance of sex, and the 1810 edition downplayed the sexual elements.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. rev. as vol. 1 of his Original Tales. London: Miller and Pople, 1810. First ed. rpt. together with the previously unpub. second part ed. G. E. Bentley, Jr. Montréal, QC, Canada: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1991, which includes “Notes on the Text” (297-306), “Epilogue The Geography of The Captive and the Historical Contexts of the Sophians, the Jovinians, and Menno” (307-22), “Appendix I Substantive Emendations to the Text of The Captive Part I (1798) found in the Second Edition (1810)” (323-48), “Appendix II Description of the Manuscript of Part 2” (349-51).

Holding Institutions

Can, L, O, PSt

Author Note

(1754-1848)

Full Text

1798 Cumberland, George (1754-1848). The Captive of the Castle of Sennaar: An African Tale Containing Various Anecdotes of the Sophians Hitherto Unknown To Mankind in General. London: Ptd. for the author. This ed. was immediately suppressed and survives in five copies. Rpt. rev. as vol. 1 of his Original Tales. London: Miller and Pople, 1810. First ed. rpt. together with the previously unpub. second part ed. G. E. Bentley, Jr. Montréal, QC, Canada: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1991, which includes “Notes on the Text” (297-306), “Epilogue The Geography of The Captive and the Historical Contexts of the Sophians, the Jovinians, and Menno” (307-22), “Appendix I Substantive Emendations to the Text of The Captive Part I (1798) found in the Second Edition (1810)” (323-48), “Appendix II Description of the Manuscript of Part 2” (349-51). Can, L, O, PSt

Two lost race eutopias in central Africa. The first, presented in the 1798 and 1810 editions, is peopled with Greek sun-worshippers. These people, the Sophians, are art lovers, Deists, have gender equality, and racial, religious and ethnic toleration. The second, presented in the second part first published in 1991, are Christians. These people, the Jovinians, have no art and proselytize their failure simple form of Protestantism and practice a general community of goods. They recognize the importance of sex, and the 1810 edition downplayed the sexual elements.