"Caught in the Organ Draft"

Title"Caught in the Organ Draft"
Year for Search1972
AuthorsSilverberg, Robert (b. 1935)
Secondary AuthorsElwood, Roger [Paul](1943-2007)
Secondary Titleand walk now gently through the fire and other science fiction stories
Pagination127-41
Date Published1972
PublisherChilton Books Co.
Place PublishedPhiladelphia, PA
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

Transplant dystopia in which young, fit people are drafted (“the organ draft”) to provide an organ to keep the elderly alive. This can be any organ and may result in death; if not, the person then becomes eligible to receive organs from others for as long as they live.

Additional Publishers

[Science Fiction Book Club ed.] (Philadelphia, PA: Chilton Books Co., 1972), 123-36. Rpt. in The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg. Volume Three: Something Wild is Loose: 1969-72 (Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2008), 368-80 with an author’s note on 367; and in Brave New Worlds. Ed. John Joseph Adams (San Francisco, CA: Night Shade Books, 2011), 375-84; 2nd ed. as Brave New Worlds: Dystopian Stories. Ed. John Joseph Adams (San Francisco, CA: Night Shade Books, 2012), 375-84

Holding Institutions

Merril, PSt

Author Note

(b. 1935)

Full Text

1972 Silverberg, Robert (b. 1935). “Caught in the Organ Draft.” and walk now gently through the fire and other science fiction stories. Ed. Roger [Paul] Elwood (Philadelphia, PA: Chilton Books Co., 1972), 127-41. [Science Fiction Book Club ed.] (Philadelphia, PA: Chilton Books Co., 1972), 123-36. Rpt. in The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg. Volume Three: Something Wild is Loose: 1969-72 (Burton, MI: Subterranean Press, 2008), 368-80 with an author’s note on 367; and in Brave New Worlds. Ed. John Joseph Adams (San Francisco, CA: Night Shade Books, 2011), 375-84; 2nd ed. as Brave New Worlds: Dystopian Stories. Ed. John Joseph Adams (San Francisco, CA: Night Shade Books, 2012), 375-84. Merril, PSt

Transplant dystopia in which young, fit people are drafted (“the organ draft”) to provide an organ to keep the elderly alive. This can be any organ and may result in death; if not, the person then becomes eligible to receive organs from others for as long as they live.