Christian Policy, the Salvation of the Empire. Being a Clear and Concise Examination into the Causes that Have Produced the Impending, Unavoidable National Bankruptcy; And the Effects that must ensue, unless averted by the Adoption of this only real and Desirable Remedy, Which would elevate these Realms to a Pitch of Greatness Hitherto Unattained By any Nation that ever Existed

TitleChristian Policy, the Salvation of the Empire. Being a Clear and Concise Examination into the Causes that Have Produced the Impending, Unavoidable National Bankruptcy; And the Effects that must ensue, unless averted by the Adoption of this only real and Desirable Remedy, Which would elevate these Realms to a Pitch of Greatness Hitherto Unattained By any Nation that ever Existed
Year for Search1816
AuthorsEvans, Thomas (b. 1763)
Date Published1816
PublisherPtd. for the author
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

Eutopia in which all land, water, mines, houses, and feudal permanent property belong to the people. Evans was a close associate of Thomas Spence (1750-1814), and this work says that the policy of the early Christians should be adopted and then goes on to describe Spence’s plan. For Spence’s utopias, see 1782, 1795, 1798, and 1801 Spence. See also 1817 and 1818 Evans.

Additional Publishers

2nd ed. London: Ptd. for the Author, 1816. The 2nd ed. is identical except for 2nd ed. on the title page.

Info Notes

Holding Institutions

DLC, L, LSE, O

Author Note

(b. 1763)

Full Text

1816 Evans, Thomas (b. 1763). Christian Policy, the Salvation of the Empire. Being a Clear and Concise Examination into the Causes that Have Produced the Impending, Unavoidable National Bankruptcy; And the Effects that must ensue, unless averted by the Adoption of this only real and Desirable Remedy, Which would elevate these Realms to a Pitch of Greatness Hitherto Unattained By any Nation that ever Existed. London: Ptd. for the author. 2nd ed. London: Ptd. for the Author, 1816. The 2nd ed. is identical except for 2nd ed. on the title page. DLC, L, LSE, O

Eutopia in which all land, water, mines, houses, and feudal permanent property belong to the people. Evans was a close associate of Thomas Spence (1750-1814), and this work says that the policy of the early Christians should be adopted and then goes on to describe Spence’s plan. For Spence’s utopias, see 1782, 1795, 1798, and 1801 Spence. See also 1817 and 1818 Evans.