A Country Not Named

TitleA Country Not Named
Year for Search1675
AuthorsLodwick, Francis(1619-1695)
Secondary AuthorsPoole, William
Secondary TitleA Country Not Named (MS. Sloane 913, fols. IR-33R). An edition with an annotated primary bibliography and an introductory essay on Lodwick and his intellectual context by William Poole
Pagination81-108 with a "textual Introduction" (71-79) and "Textual notes to CNN" (109-10).
Date Published[1675-79?]/2007
PublisherACMRS (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies)
Place PublishedTempe, AZ
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

Eutopia. Detailed records kept on all people and all “matters notable” in each division of the country. The people had been monotheists, became polytheists, then returned to monotheism, and ultimately became Christians. Ideal language, which was one of the author’s interests. Compulsory education from six with separate schools for girls with women teachers, with the education for girls the same as that for boys except that they are taught sewing and not taught gymnastics. Few laws and those read out to the population once a month.

Additional Publishers

Also in Francis Lodwick, On Language, Theology and Utopia. Ed. Felicity Henderson and William Poole (Oxford, Eng.: Clarendon Press, 2010), 265-87.

Info Notes

 The original manuscript is in the British Library Sloane collection. (MS. Sloane 913, fols. IR-33R)

Holding Institutions

PSt

Author Note

The author (1619-95) was part of the circle around Samuel A. Hartlib (c1600-62). On Hartlib and his circle, see Charles Webster, ed. Samuel Hartlib and the Advancement of Learning. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1970.

Full Text

[1675-79?] Lodwick, Francis (1619-95). A Country Not Named (MS. Sloane 913, fols. IR-33R) An edition with an annotated primary bibliography and an introductory essay on Lodwick and his intellectual context by William Poole (Tempe, AZ: ACMRS (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies), 2007), 81-108 with “textual Introduction” (71-79) and “Textual notes to CNN: (109-10). Also in Francis Lodwick, On Language, Theology and Utopia. Ed. Felicity Henderson and William Poole (Oxford, Eng.: Clarendon Press, 2010), 265-87. PSt

Eutopia. Detailed records kept on all people and all “matters notable” in each division of the country. The people had been monotheists, became polytheists, then returned to monotheism, and ultimately became Christians. Ideal language, which was one of the author’s interests. Compulsory education from six with separate schools for girls with women teachers, with the education for girls the same as that for boys except that they are taught sewing and not taught gymnastics. Few laws and those read out to the population once a month. The author was part of the circle around Samuel A. Hartlib (c1600-62). On Hartlib and his circle, see Charles Webster, ed. Samuel Hartlib and the Advancement of Learning. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1970.