"The Dark Cottage"

Title"The Dark Cottage"
Year for Search1919
AuthorsCholmondeley, Mary(1859-1925)
Secondary TitlePears's Christmas Annual (London)
Pagination8-11
Date Published1919
KeywordsEnglish author, Female author
Annotation

Eutopia in which a man who had been a relatively enlightened industrialist wakes up fifty years after being injured in World War I and is led to see how unenlightened he had actually been. Examples given are that he introduced electricity to his own estate but not, although easily able to do so, to his works, built houses for his workers but in an extremely unhealthy, swampy area because it was convenient to his factories, which were polluting the atmosphere, opposed women’s suffrage, and generally opposed any legislation that would have improved the education, health, or working conditions of the lower classes. The eutopia, though, is still class based and the upper classes still have servants.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. in her The Romance of His Life and Other Romances (London: John Murray, 1921), 55-82. U. S. ed. (New York: Dodd, Mead, 1921), 55-82.

Holding Institutions

LLL, O, PSt

Author Note

Female author (1859-1925). 

Full Text

1919 Cholmondeley, Mary (1859-1925). “The Dark Cottage.” Pears’ Christmas Annual (London) (1919): 8-11. Rpt. in her The Romance of His Life and Other Romances (London: John Murray, 1921), 55-82. U. S. ed. (New York: Dodd, Mead, 1921), 55-82. LLL, O, PSt

Eutopia in which a man who had been a relatively enlightened industrialist wakes up fifty years after being injured in World War I and is led to see how unenlightened he had actually been. Examples given are that he introduced electricity to his own estate but not, although easily able to do so, to his works, built houses for his workers but in an extremely unhealthy, swampy area because it was convenient to his factories, which were polluting the atmosphere, opposed women’s suffrage, and generally opposed any legislation that would have improved the education, health, or working conditions of the lower classes. The eutopia, though, is still class based and the upper classes still have servants. Female author.