Darkness and Dawn

TitleDarkness and Dawn
Year for Search1914
AuthorsEngland, George Allan (1877-1936)
Date Published1914
PublisherSmall, Maynard
Place PublishedBoston, MA
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

Much of the novel is a post-catastrophe dystopia with a young couple apparently alone struggling to survive, then in conflict with other survivors, but the novel ends depicting the beginnings of a new egalitarian, peaceful eutopian society.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. Westport, CT: Hyperion Press, 1974 with unpaged “The Fantastic in Fiction” by the author, originally published as “Facts About Fantasy.” The Story World (July 1923). Originally serialized as “Darkness and Dawn.” The Cavalier 10. 4 (January 1912): 621-34; The Cavalier and the Scrap Book 11.1 - 3 (January 6 - 20, 1912): 169-85, 321-39, 521-33; “Beyond the Great Oblivion.” The Cavalier 24.1 - 25.2 (January 4 - February 8, 1913): 1-34, 215-32, 434-52, 645-65; 115-34, 272-92; and “The Afterglow.” Cavalier 29.4 - 30.3 (June 14 - July 5, 1913): 577-607; 71-100, 250-78, 495-519. All three were rpt. in Famous Fantastic Mysteries 2.3 (August 1940: 6-78; 3.2 (June 1941): 6-105; 3.5 (December 1941): 6-94.

Illustration

Illus.

Holding Institutions

PSt

Author Note

(1877-1936)

Full Text

1914 England, George Allan (1877-1936). Darkness and Dawn. Illus. Boston: Small, Maynard. Rpt. Westport, CT: Hyperion Press, 1974 with unpaged “The Fantastic in Fiction” by the author, originally published as “Facts About Fantasy.” The Story World (July 1923). Originally serialized as “Darkness and Dawn.” The Cavalier 10. 4 (January 1912): 621-34; The Cavalier and the Scrap Book 11.1 - 3 (January 6 - 20, 1912): 169-85, 321-39, 521-33; “Beyond the Great Oblivion.” The Cavalier 24.1 - 25.2 (January 4 - February 8, 1913): 1-34, 215-32, 434-52, 645-65; 115-34, 272-92; and “The Afterglow.” Cavalier 29.4 - 30.3 (June 14 - July 5, 1913): 577-607; 71-100, 250-78, 495-519. All three were rpt. in Famous Fantastic Mysteries 2.3 (August 1940: 6-78; 3.2 (June 1941): 6-105; 3.5 (December 1941): 6-94. PSt

Much of the novel is a post-catastrophe dystopia with a young couple apparently alone struggling to survive, then in conflict with other survivors, but the novel ends depicting the beginnings of a new egalitarian, peaceful eutopian society.