Darkwater: Voices from within the Veil

TitleDarkwater: Voices from within the Veil
Year for Search1920
AuthorsDu Bois, W[illiam] E[dward] Burghardt(1868-1963)
Tertiary AuthorsDu Bois, W. E. Burghardt
Date Published1920
PublisherHarcourt, Brace and Howe
Place PublishedNew York
KeywordsAfrican American author, Male author
Annotation

Eutopia. A collection of essays, poems, and short stories that culminates in a eutopia in the story “The Comet” (253-73), which is rpt. in Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora. Ed. Sheree R. Thomas (New York: Warner Books, 2000), 5-18; and in Grave Predictions: Tales of Mankind’s Post-Apocalyptic, Dystopian and Disastrous Destiny. Ed. Drew [Andrew] Ford (Mineola, NY: Dover, 2016), 10-24; and the poem “A Hymn to the Peoples” (275-76) in both which the importance of racial differences disappear. 

Additional Publishers

Rpt. New York: Schocken Books, 1969; and as a volume in The Oxford W.E.B. Du Bois. New York: Oxford University Press, 2007, with an "Introduction" by Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham (xxv-xxxix). U.K. ed. London: Constable, 1920.

Info Notes

Du Bois called it the second of his volume of essays between The Souls of Black Folk (1903) and Dusk of Dawn (1940).

Holding Institutions

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Author Note

The African American author, best-known as W. E. B. Du Bois, (1868-1963) was the first African American to receive a doctorate from Harvard University and was one of the most prominent African American thinkers in the U. S. in the early twentieth century.

Full Text

1920 Du Bois, W[illiam] E[dward] Burghardt (1868-1963). Darkwater: Voices from within the Veil. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Howe. Rpt. New York: Schocken Books, 1969; and as a volume in The Oxford W.E.B. Du Bois. New York: Oxford University Press, 2007, with an “Introduction” by Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham (xxv-xxxix). U.K. ed. London: Constable, 1920. Du Bois called it the second of his volume of essays between The Souls of Black Folk (1903) and Dusk of Dawn (1940). PSt

Eutopia. A collection of essays, poems, and short stories that culminates in a eutopia in the story “The Comet” (253-73), which is rpt. in Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora. Ed. Sheree R. Thomas (New York: Warner Books, 2000), 5-18; and in Grave Predictions: Tales of Mankind’s Post-Apocalyptic, Dystopian and Disastrous Destiny. Ed. Drew [Andrew] Ford (Mineola, NY: Dover, 2016), 10-24; and the poem “A Hymn to the Peoples” (275-76) in both which the importance of racial differences disappear. The African American author, best-known as W. E. B. Du Bois, was the first African American to receive a doctorate from Harvard University and was one of the most prominent African American thinkers in the U. S. in the early twentieth century.