The Decline and Fall of the British Empire. A brief account of those cases which resulted in the destruction of our late Ally, together with a comparison between the British and Roman Empires. Appointed for use in the National Schools of Japan--Tokio, 2005--

TitleThe Decline and Fall of the British Empire. A brief account of those cases which resulted in the destruction of our late Ally, together with a comparison between the British and Roman Empires. Appointed for use in the National Schools of Japan--Tokio, 2005--
Year for Search1905
Authors[Mills], [Elliott E.](1881-1956)
Date Published1905
PublisherAlden & Co., Ltd., Bocardo Press/Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co, Ltd.
Place PublishedOxford, Eng./London
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

The British Empire fell in 1995 and the colonies are now all colonies of other empires. Brought about by British leaders becoming talkers rather than actors, the shift from country to city, the rejection of sea power, “the growth of refinement and luxury”, the decline in taste in literature and drama, the decline in physical health, “the decline of intellectual and religious life”, high taxes and exorbitant municipal spending, and the inability to defend themselves or the empire. Compared throughout to the decline and fall of Rome as described by Edward Gibbon in The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776-88).

Holding Institutions

L, NLS

Author Note

(1881-1956)

Full Text

1905 [Mills, Elliott E.] (1881-1956). The Decline and Fall of the British Empire. A brief account of those cases which resulted in the destruction of our late Ally, together with a comparison between the British and Roman Empires. Appointed for use in the National Schools of Japan–Tokio, 2005. Oxford, Eng.: Alden & Co., Ltd., Bocardo Press/London: Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co, Ltd., 1905. L, NLS

The British Empire fell in 1995 and the colonies are now all colonies of other empires. Brought about by British leaders becoming talkers rather than actors, the shift from country to city, the rejection of sea power, “the growth of refinement and luxury”, the decline in taste in literature and drama, the decline in physical health, “the decline of intellectual and religious life”, high taxes and exorbitant municipal spending, and the inability to defend themselves or the empire. Compared throughout to the decline and fall of Rome as described by Edward Gibbon in The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776-88).