"In the Depths of the Dark Continent; or, The Vengeance of Van Vincent"

Title"In the Depths of the Dark Continent; or, The Vengeance of Van Vincent"
Year for Search1892
Authors[Shea], [Cornelius](1863-1920)
Tertiary AuthorsAuthor of “The Wreck of the ‘Glaucus’”, [pseud.]
Secondary TitleBrave and Bold
Volume / Editionno. 109
PaginationEntire issue (32 pp)
Date Published1892/January 21, 1905
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

Mostly adventure but includes two flawed utopias. The first is a “Paradise of Women”, but the women live in an all-female community simply because there are too many women in the larger community. The second is called “the African Utopia” which was established on the site of an earlier community founded by an extinct people and rediscovered by Egyptians in sixteenth century. It had grown to over two thousand people because no one ever left and now all modern languages are spoken there. No money. All worked and anyone who refused was fed to lions. Annual elections. 

Additional Publishers

Rpt. as “In the Depths of the Dark Continent; or, The Vengeance of Van Vincent.” By the Author of “The Wreck of the ‘Glaucus’” [pseud.]. Brave and Bold, no. 109 (January 21, 1905). Entire issue. 32 pp. 

Pseudonym

Author of “The Wreck of the ‘Glaucus’” [pseud.]

Holding Institutions

MnU

Author Note

(1863-1920)

Full Text

1892 [Shea, Cornelius] (1863-1920). “Van Vincent’s Vow; Or, Chased to the Heart of the Dark Continent. A Story of Pluck and Adventure.” Golden Hours 9-10.226 -235 (May 28 - July 30, 1892): 273-75, 289-91, 313-14, 325-26, 339-41, 357-58, 379-81, 387-89, 404-05; 4-5. Rpt. as “In the Depths of the Dark Continent; or, The Vengeance of Van Vincent.” By the Author of “The Wreck of the ‘Glaucus’” [pseud.]. Brave and Bold, no. 109 (January 21, 1905). Entire issue. 32 pp. DLC, MnU

Mostly adventure but includes two flawed utopias. The first is a “Paradise of Women”, but the women live in an all-female community simply because there are too many women in the larger community. The second is called “the African Utopia” which was established on the site of an earlier community founded by an extinct people and rediscovered by Egyptians in sixteenth century. It had grown to over two thousand people because no one ever left and now all modern languages are spoken there. No money. All worked and anyone who refused was fed to lions. Annual elections.