A Description of the famous Kingdome of Macaria; shewing its excellent Government: Wherein The Inhabitants live in great Prosperity, Health, and Happinesse; the King obeyed, the Nobles honoured; and all good men respected, Vice punished, and Vertue rewarded. An Example to other Nations: In a Dialogue between a Schollar and a Traveller

TitleA Description of the famous Kingdome of Macaria; shewing its excellent Government: Wherein The Inhabitants live in great Prosperity, Health, and Happinesse; the King obeyed, the Nobles honoured; and all good men respected, Vice punished, and Vertue rewarded. An Example to other Nations: In a Dialogue between a Schollar and a Traveller
Year for Search1641
Authors[Plattes], [Gabriel](d. 1644)
Date Published1641
PublisherPtd. for Francis Constable
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

Eutopia. A short dialogue covering economic organization, religion, and some governmental organization. Monarchy with power in a grand or general council or parliament and five under-councils. Government revenues are mostly derived from the king’s lands. Practical orientation. Includes a College of Experience similar to Bacon’s Salomon’s House in his New Atlantis (1627). Macaria means “blessed” or “happy”. More used it for a country near Utopia.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. with minor changes in spelling and punctuation in The Harleian Miscellany: A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, As Well in Manuscript as in Print. Found in the Late Earl of Oxford’s Library, Interspersed with Historical, Political, and Critical Notes. With a Table of Contents, and an Alphabetical Index 10 vols. (London: Ptd. For T. Osborne, 1744), 1: 564-69. Collection rpt. with the subtitle A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, As Well in Manuscript as in Print. Selected from the Library of Edward Harley, Second Earl of Oxford, Interspersed with Historical, Political, and Critical Annotations, By William Oldys, and Some Additional Notes by Thomas Park (London: Ptd. for White and Cochrane, and John Murray, 1808-13), 1: 580-85; as A Facsimile Edition of Samuel Hartlib’s 1641 Pamphlet A Description of the Famous Kingdome of Macaria. Ed. Richard H. Dillon. Sausalito, CA: Élan Under the direction of Wallace Kibbee Corte Madera, CA, 1961, with an unpaged four page “Introduction” by Dillon; in Samuel Hartlib and the Advancement of Learning. Ed. Charles Webster (Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1970), 79-89; and in Charles Webster, Utopian Planning and the Puritan Revolution: Gabriel Plattes, Samuel Hartlib and “Macaria”. Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine Research Publications II (Oxford, Eng.: Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 1979), 65-73 with annotations (74-89).

Info Notes

Traditionally attributed to Samuel A. Hartlib (ca. 1600-62). See Charles Webster. “The Authorship and Significance of Macaria.” Past and Present, no. 56 (August 1972): 34-48 for the current attribution.

Holding Institutions

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Author Note

During his lifetime Plattes (d. 1644) was best known for his writings on agriculture.

Full Text

1641 [Plattes, Gabriel] (d. 1644). A Description of the famous Kingdome of Macaria; shewing its excellent Government: Wherein The Inhabitants live in great Prosperity, Health, and Happinesse; the King obeyed, the Nobles honoured; and all good men respected, Vice punished, and Vertue rewarded. An Example to other Nations: In a Dialogue between a Schollar and a Traveller. London: Ptd. for Francis Constable. Rpt. with minor changes in spelling and punctuation in The Harleian Miscellany: A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, As Well in Manuscript as in Print. Found in the Late Earl of Oxford’s Library, Interspersed with Historical, Political, and Critical Notes. With a Table of Contents, and an Alphabetical Index 10 vols. (London: Ptd. For T. Osborne, 1744), 1: 564-69. Collection rpt. with the subtitle A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, As Well in Manuscript as in Print. Selected from the Library of Edward Harley, Second Earl of Oxford, Interspersed with Historical, Political, and Critical Annotations, By William Oldys, and Some Additional Notes by Thomas Park (London: Ptd. for White and Cochrane, and John Murray, 1808-13), 1: 580-85; as A Facsimile Edition of Samuel Hartlib’s 1641 Pamphlet A Description of the Famous Kingdome of Macaria. Ed. Richard H. Dillon. Sausalito, CA: Élan Under the direction of Wallace Kibbee Corte Madera, CA, 1961, with an unpaged four page “Introduction” by Dillon; in Samuel Hartlib and the Advancement of Learning. Ed. Charles Webster (Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1970), 79-89; and in Charles Webster, Utopian Planning and the Puritan Revolution: Gabriel Plattes, Samuel Hartlib and “Macaria”. Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine Research Publications II (Oxford, Eng.: Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, 1979), 65-73 with annotations (74-89). Traditionally attributed to Samuel A. Hartlib (ca. 1600-62). See Charles Webster. “The Authorship and Significance of Macaria.” Past and Present, no. 56 (August 1972): 34-48 for the current attribution. L

Eutopia. A short dialogue covering economic organization, religion, and some governmental organization. Monarchy with power in a grand or general council or parliament and five under-councils. Government revenues are mostly derived from the king’s lands. Practical orientation. Includes a College of Experience similar to Bacon’s Salomon’s House in his New Atlantis (1627). Macaria means “blessed” or “happy”. More used it for a country near Utopia. During his lifetime Plattes was best known for his writings on agriculture.