A Development of the Principles and Plans on which to Establish Self-Supporting Home Colonies; as a Most Secure and Profitable Investment for Capital, and an Effectual Means Permanently to Remove the Causes of Ignorance, Poverty, and Crime. And Most Materially to Benefit All Classes of Society by Giving a Right Attention to the Now Greatly Misdirected Powers of the Human Faculties and of Physical and Moral Science

TitleA Development of the Principles and Plans on which to Establish Self-Supporting Home Colonies; as a Most Secure and Profitable Investment for Capital, and an Effectual Means Permanently to Remove the Causes of Ignorance, Poverty, and Crime. And Most Materially to Benefit All Classes of Society by Giving a Right Attention to the Now Greatly Misdirected Powers of the Human Faculties and of Physical and Moral Science
Year for Search1841
AuthorsOwen, Robert (1771-1858)
Date Published1841
PublisherHome Colonization Society
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsMale author, Scottish author, Welsh author
Annotation

Detailed description of the transition to the Owenite eutopia through the establishment of communities designed to become self-supporting. Each community planned for 2000 to 2500 permanent residents on 2000 to 3000 acres. Includes descriptions of the buildings and gardens and the “General Rules and Regulations” for the community (396-401 in Claeys). See also 1813, 1830, 1839, 1843, 1844, 1846, and 1855 (2). 

Additional Publishers

2nd ed. London: Home Colonization Society, 1841; rpt. in Selected Works of Robert Owen. Ed. Gregory Claeys. 4 vols. (London: William Pickering, 1993), 2: 337-407.

Holding Institutions

PSt

Author Note

Owen (1771-1858) was born in Wales and his first major experiment was at New Lanark, Scotland, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. 

Full Text

1841 Owen, Robert (1771-1858). A Development of the Principles and Plans on which to Establish Self-Supporting Home Colonies; as a Most Secure and Profitable Investment for Capital, and an Effectual Means Permanently to Remove the Causes of Ignorance, Poverty, and Crime. And Most Materially to Benefit All Classes of Society by Giving a Right Attention to the Now Greatly Misdirected Powers of the Human Faculties and of Physical and Moral Science. London: Home Colonization Society. 2nd ed. London: Home Colonization Society, 1841; rpt. in Selected Works of Robert Owen. Ed. Gregory Claeys. 4 vols. (London: William Pickering, 1993), 2: 337-407. PSt

Detailed description of the transition to the Owenite eutopia through the establishment of communities designed to become self-supporting. Each community planned for 2000 to 2500 permanent residents on 2000 to 3000 acres. Includes descriptions of the buildings and gardens and the General Rules and Regulations” for the community (396-401 in Claeys). See also 1813, 1830, 1839, 1843, 1844, 1846, and 1855 (2). Owen was born in Wales and his first major experiment was at New Lanark, Scotland, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site.