"A Dream of the Twenty-First Century"

Title"A Dream of the Twenty-First Century"
Year for Search1902
AuthorsCooley, Winnifred Harper(1874-1967)
Secondary TitleArena (Boston, MA)
Volume / Edition28.5
Pagination511-16
Date PublishedNovember 1902
KeywordsFemale author, US author
Annotation

Eutopia. Government ownership of basic resources and utilities brought about by women’s votes. Compulsory education through twenty-two. Initiative and referendum. Everyone works an average five hour day. No trusts. Civil service. Rational religion based on the moral teachings of Jesus. Marriage universal and two children is the norm. See the author’s The New Womankind. New York: Broadway Publishers, 1904

Additional Publishers

Rpt. in Daring To Dream: Utopian Stories by United States Women, 1836-1919. Ed. Carol Farley Kessler (London: Pandora Press, 1984), 207-11 with an editor’s note on 205-06; and in Daring To Dream: Utopian Stories By United States Women Before 1950. Ed. Carol Farley Kessler. 2nd ed. (Syracuse, New York: Syracuse University Press, 1995), 126-30

Holding Institutions

PSt

Author Note

The female author (1874-1967) was the daughter of Ida Husted Harper (1851-1931), who was active in the women’s suffrage movement.

Full Text

1902 Cooley, Winnifred Harper (1874-1967). “A Dream of the Twenty-First Century.” Arena (Boston, MA) 28.5 (November 1902): 511-16. Rpt. in Daring To Dream: Utopian Stories by United States Women, 1836-1919. Ed. Carol Farley Kessler (London: Pandora Press, 1984), 207-11 with an editor’s note on 205-06; and in Daring To Dream: Utopian Stories By United States Women Before 1950. Ed. Carol Farley Kessler. 2nd ed. (Syracuse, New York: Syracuse University Press, 1995), 126-30. PSt

Eutopia. Government ownership of basic resources and utilities brought about by women’s votes. Compulsory education through twenty-two. Initiative and referendum. Everyone works an average five hour day. No trusts. Civil service. Rational religion based on the moral teachings of Jesus. Marriage universal and two children is the norm. See the author’s The New Womankind. New York: Broadway Publishers, 1904. The female author was the daughter of Ida Husted Harper (1851-1931), who was active in the women’s suffrage movement.