"Energy Island"

Title"Energy Island"
Year for Search1988
AuthorsGilbert, G[arvin] R[obert](b. 1917)
Tertiary AuthorsGilbert, G. R.
Pagination839 pp.
Date Published1988
PublisherG. R. Gilbert Papers, Macmillan Brown Library, University of Canterbury. MB 957, Boxes 8-9, items 33-59.
KeywordsAotearoa New Zealand author, Male author
Annotation

Dystopia. In order to create the fuels necessary for the country, the government decides that much of the South Island of New Zealand should be used for the production of ethanol and methanol from beets and trees. It authorizes the South Island Office (SIO) of the Department of Internal Affairs to undertake the project, and it quickly effectively establishes itself as the ruler of the South Island, which becomes an authoritarian dystopia with all aspects of life controlled. A resistance movement develops, first bombing electricity pylons and ultimately setting off a small nuclear bomb in central Christchurch. The SIO is disbanded and initially leaderless self-help groups spring up, order is quickly restored throughout the South Island, and the self-help groups become small cooperative communities. A new religious community in the mountains begins to raid the plains and a war breaks out. The religious community wins the war and establishes control over much of the South Island. See the note at 1952 Gilbert.

Additional Publishers

Parts were published; see 1985, 1986, and 1992 Gilbert, Acts of Terror and Delight; and there is a privately published version of the first 628 pages, ending in mid-sentence. Energy Island. Lincoln, New Zealand: Clear Light & Self Revelation Institute, 1988, which says "This edition is not for sale. Privately printed and produced it is limited to five copies autographed by the author." G.R. Gilbert Papers, Macmillan Brown Library, University of Canterbury. MB 957, Box 5, item 16, and there are other manuscript of parts of the text--Box 3, item 7; Box 4, item 10; and Box 6, item 17.

Author Note

The Aotearoa/New Zealand author’s name (b. 1917) is most often given incorrectly as Gavin.

Full Text

1988 Gilbert, G[arvin] R[obert] (b. 1917). “Energy Island.” G.R. Gilbert Papers, Macmillan Brown Library, University of Canterbury. MB 957, Boxes 8-9, items 33-59. 839 pp. Parts were published; see 1985, 1986, and 1992 Gilbert, Acts of Terror and Delight; and there is a privately published version of the first 628 pages, ending in mid-sentence. Energy Island. Lincoln, New Zealand: Clear Light & Self Revelation Institute, 1988, which says “This edition is not for sale. Privately printed and produced it is limited to five copies autographed by the author.” G.R. Gilbert Papers, Macmillan Brown Library, University of Canterbury. MB 957, Box 5, item 16, and there are other manuscript of parts of the text--Box 3, item 7; Box 4, item 10; and Box 6, item 17.

Dystopia. In order to create the fuels necessary for the country, the government decides that much of the South Island of New Zealand should be used for the production of ethanol and methanol from beets and trees. It authorizes the South Island Office (SIO) of the Department of Internal Affairs to undertake the project, and it quickly establishes itself as the ruler of the South Island, which becomes an authoritarian dystopia with all aspects of life controlled. A resistance movement develops, first bombing electricity pylons and ultimately setting off a small nuclear bomb in central Christchurch. The SIO is disbanded and initially leaderless self-help groups spring up, order is quickly restored throughout the South Island, and the self-help groups become small cooperative communities. A new religious community in the mountains begins to raid the plains and a war breaks out. The religious community wins the war and establishes control over much of the South island. See his The Dramatis Personae of Gilbert’s Novel entitled Energy Island. Selected and introduced by Sary Hooptide [pseud.]. Christchurch, New Zealand: dean farran printproductions. Exp. ed. Christchurch, New Zealand: dean farran printproductions, 1990 (ATL). The Aotearoa/New Zealand author’s name is most often given incorrectly as Gavin.