Foundation's Edge

TitleFoundation's Edge
Year for Search1982
AuthorsAsimov, Isaac(1920-92)
Date Published1982
PublisherDoubleday & Co
Place PublishedGarden City, NY
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

Fourth vol. of the famous series. While the focus of the novel is on the sweep of historical change that was the focus of the trilogy, none of which were eutopian and are best characterized as early social science fiction, this volume includes a eutopia called Gaia, where the world is itself sentient. The entire planet including flora and fauna as well as the people have a group consciousness. Everything does what is needed for itself and the planet and no more. See also 1986 and 1988 Asimov.

Additional Publishers

Excerpts published as “Foundation’s Edge.” Omni 5.1 (October 1982): 64-68, 70, 156-58; and, under the same title, in Asimov’s Science Fiction 6.12 (59) (December 1982): 44-49, 50-52, 54-61, 63-65, 67-71, 73-74, 76-77, 79, 81-82, 84-85, 87, with comments on the Foundation series by various authors on the intervening pages.

Info Notes

The series includes Foundation. New York: Gnome, 1951 (abridged as The 1,000  Year Plan. Original Title: Foundation. New York: Ace Books, 1955 as an Ace Double bound with Poul Anderson, No World of Their Own [1955]; originally published as “The Long Way Home.” Astounding Science Fiction 55 [April - July 1955]); Foundation and Empire. New York: Gnome, 1952 (also published as The Man Who Upset the Universe. Original Title: Foundation and Empire. New York: Ace Books, [1955]); and Second Foundation. New York: Gnome, 1953. Published together as The Foundation Trilogy: Three Classics of Science Fiction. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1982. Some of the series were originally published as stories in Astounding Science-Fiction as follows: “Foundation.” 29.3 (May 1942): 38-53. “Bridle and Saddle.” 29.4 (June 1942): 9-30. “The Big and the Little.” 33.6 (August 1944): 7-53. “The Wedge.” 34.2 (October 1944): 64-79. “Dead Hand.” 35.2 (April 1945): 6-60; “The Mule.” 36.3 - 4 (November - December 1945): 7-53, 139-44; 60-97, 148-68. “Now You See It.” 40.5 (January 1948): 7-61. “… And Now You Don’t.” 44.3 - 5 (November 1949 - January 1950): 5-40; 120-61; 111-34, 136-44, 146-52. A connected novel is 1950 Asimov. The series has produced a collection that develops the themes of Asimov’s work; See Foundation’s Friends: Stories in Honor of Isaac Asimov. Ed. Martin H[arry] Greenberg. New York: Tor, 1989. Three authorized sequels have been published–Gregory Benford, Foundation’s Fear. New York: HarperPrism, 1997; Greg Bear, Foundation and Chaos. New York: HarperPrism, 1998; and David Brin, Foundation’s Triumph. New York: HarperPrism, 1999

Author Note

The author (1920-92) was born in Russia, brought to the U. S. age three, and became a U. S. citizen in 1928. His name was anglicized from Isaak Iudich Azimov

Full Text

1982 Asimov, Isaac (1920-92). Foundation’s Edge. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. Excerpts published as “Foundation’s Edge.” Omni 5.1 (October 1982): 64-68, 70, 156-58; and, under the same title, in Asimov’s Science Fiction 6.12 (59) (December 1982): 44-49, 50-52, 54-61, 63-65, 67-71, 73-74, 76-77, 79, 81-82, 84-85, 87, with comments on the Foundation series by various authors on the intervening pages. Fourth vol. of the famous series: Foundation. New York: Gnome, 1951 (abridged as The 1,000  Year Plan. Original Title: Foundation. New York: Ace Books, 1955 as an Ace Double bound with Poul Anderson, No World of Their Own [1955]; originally published as “The Long Way Home.” Astounding Science Fiction 55 [April - July 1955]); Foundation and Empire. New York: Gnome, 1952 (also published as The Man Who Upset the Universe. Original Title: Foundation and Empire. New York: Ace Books, [1955]); and Second Foundation. New York: Gnome, 1953. Published together as The Foundation Trilogy: Three Classics of Science Fiction. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1982. Some of the series were originally published as stories in Astounding Science-Fiction as follows: “Foundation.” 29.3 (May 1942): 38-53. “Bridle and Saddle.” 29.4 (June 1942): 9-30. “The Big and the Little.” 33.6 (August 1944): 7-53. “The Wedge.” 34.2 (October 1944): 64-79. “Dead Hand.” 35.2 (April 1945): 6-60; “The Mule.” 36.3 - 4 (November - December 1945): 7-53, 139-44; 60-97, 148-68. “Now You See It.” 40.5 (January 1948): 7-61. “… And Now You Don’t.” 44.3 - 5 (November 1949 - January 1950): 5-40; 120-61; 111-34, 136-44, 146-52. A connected novel is 1950 Asimov. The series has produced a collection that develops the themes of Asimov’s work; See Foundation’s Friends: Stories in Honor of Isaac Asimov. Ed. Martin H[arry] Greenberg. New York: Tor, 1989. Three authorized sequels have been published–Gregory Benford, Foundation’s Fear. New York: HarperPrism, 1997; Greg Bear, Foundation and Chaos. New York: HarperPrism, 1998; and David Brin, Foundation’s Triumph. New York: HarperPrism, 1999.

Fourth vol. of the famous series. While the focus of the novel is on the sweep of historical change that was the focus of the trilogy, none of which were eutopian and are best characterized as early social science fiction, this volume includes a eutopia called Gaia, where the world is itself sentient. The entire planet including flora and fauna as well as the people have a group consciousness. Everything does what is needed for itself and the planet and no more. See also 1986 and 1988 Asimov. The author was born in Russia, brought to the U. S. age three, and became a U. S. citizen in 1928. His name was anglicized from Isaak Iudich Azimov