The Golden Age: or; Future Glory of North-America Discovered by An Angel to Celadon. In Several Entertaining Visions. Vision I

TitleThe Golden Age: or; Future Glory of North-America Discovered by An Angel to Celadon. In Several Entertaining Visions. Vision I
Year for Search1785
AuthorsCeladon, [pseud.]
Date Published1785
PublisherNp
Place PublishedNp
KeywordsUS author
Annotation

Depicts a future America, it has more detail on the institutions of that future. The angel is one of those who were appointed to oversee the colonies and inspire “your statesmen and heroes with courage” (6). While America cannot be protected “from the usual vicissitudes of fortune… . The States will doubtless watch over one another with the strictest vigilance” and thus protect the country from “gross innovation” (7). It will benefit from the “continual emigration” of the “poor, the oppressed, and the persecuted” and will prosper as long as the people do not give in to “pride and luxury” (9). New states will be added, including Savagenia, for Indians and Nigrania for Negroes after the end of slavery. And given the size of the country, there may well be states for Jews and for those arriving from other countries, with only European ones mentioned.

URL https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/evans/N34108.0001.001/1:3?rgn=div1;view=fulltext
Pseudonym

Celadon [pseud.]

Holding Institutions

W1,500

Full Text

1785 Celadon [pseud.]. The Golden Age: or; Future Glory of North-America Discovered by An Angel to Celadon. In Several Entertaining Visions. Vision I. 16 pp. Np: Np.  https://quod. lib. umich.edu/e/evans/N34 108.0001.001/1:3?rgn=div1;view=fulltext, W1,500

Depicts a future America, it has more detail on the institutions of that future. The angel is one of those who were appointed to oversee the colonies and inspire “your statesmen and heroes with courage” (6). While America cannot be protected “from the usual vicissitudes of fortune… . The States will doubtless watch over one another with the strictest vigilance” and thus protect the country from “gross innovation” (7). It will benefit from the “continual emigration” of the “poor, the oppressed, and the persecuted” and will prosper as long as the people do not give in to “pride and luxury” (9). New states will be added, including Savagenia, for Indians and Nigrania for Negroes after the end of slavery. And given the size of the country, there may well be states for Jews and for those arriving from other countries, with only European ones mentioned.