Hygeia: A City of Health

TitleHygeia: A City of Health
Year for Search1876
AuthorsRichardson, Benjamin Ward(1828-96)
Date Published1876
PublisherMacmillan and Co
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

Very detailed eutopia in an address to the Health Department of the Social Science Congress describing the healthy city of the future. Pollution controls on fires. Roof gardens. No carpets. No one smokes or drinks alcohol and everyone exercises. Factories out of town. Public laundries under state supervision; public street cleaning. Burial without embalming or a casket. Low houses. Railroads and sewage underground; roads all paved. No rooms underground. Publicly supervised slaughter houses. Model hospital. The author was a scientist and a leader of the temperance movement as well as a sanitation campaigner. The author says that he is suggesting only what is now easily possible. See also 1888 Richardson.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. New York: Garland, 1985 bound with Robert Pemberton's The Happy Colony (1854).

Holding Institutions

L, LLL

Author Note

The author (1828-96) was a well-known doctor who was trained and initially practiced in Scotland and moved to London in the early 1850s.

Full Text

1876 Richardson, Benjamin Ward (1828-96). Hygeia: A City of Health. London: Macmillan and Co. Rpt. New York: Garland, 1985 bound with Robert Pemberton’s The Happy Colony (1854). L, LLL

Very detailed eutopia in an address to the Health Department of the Social Science Congress describing the healthy city of the future. Pollution controls on fires. Roof gardens. No carpets. No one smokes or drinks alcohol and everyone exercises. Factories out of town. Public laundries under state supervision; public street cleaning. Burial without embalming or a casket. Low houses. Railroads and sewage underground; roads all paved. No rooms underground. Publicly supervised slaughter houses. Model hospital. The author was a scientist and a leader of the temperance movement as well as a sanitation campaigner. The author says that he is suggesting only what is now easily possible. See also 1888 Richardson. The author was a well-known doctor who was trained and initially practiced in Scotland and moved to London in the early 1850s.