If I Were Dictator

TitleIf I Were Dictator
Year for Search1934
AuthorsHuxley, Julian (1887-1975)
Date Published1934
PublisherMethuen
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

Eutopia. Detailed reform. Application of the scientific method to the problems of dictatorship. Based on scientific humanism and an experimental outlook and support for scientific research. Planned society with a Central Planning Council. Freedom of belief. Support public art. Reform marriage and divorce with trial marriage and sex education. Civic conscription for both men and women eighteen to twenty. Reorganize government. Industrial corporations such as steel, coal, building, and milk. Ownership, management, and labor equally represented on the central council of each corporation, which has significant self-government..

Additional Publishers

Excerpts published as “If I Were Dictator.” Harper’s Monthly Magazine 169 (October 1934): 529-39. Much expanded version New York: Harper & Brothers, 1934.

Info Notes

Part of a series published in 1934 and 1935. Others in the series are 1934 Dunsany, Erskine, and Raglan, and 1935 Bartlett, Maxton, and Sheppard

Holding Institutions

DLC, L

Author Note

(1887-1975)

Full Text

1934 Huxley, Julian (1887-1975). If I Were Dictator. London: Methuen. Excerpts published as “If I Were Dictator.” Harper’s Monthly Magazine (New York) 169 (October 1934): 529-39. Much expanded version New York: Harper & Brothers, 1934. DLC, L

Eutopia. Detailed reform. Application of the scientific method to the problems of dictatorship. Based on scientific humanism and an experimental outlook and support for scientific research. Planned society with a Central Planning Council. Freedom of belief. Support public art. Reform marriage and divorce with trial marriage and sex education. Civic conscription for both men and women eighteen to twenty. Reorganize government. Industrial corporations such as steel, coal, building, and milk. Ownership, management, and labor equally represented on the central council of each corporation, which has significant self-government. Part of a series published in 1934 and 1935. Others in the series are 1934 Dunsany, Erskine, and Raglan, and 1935 Bartlett, Maxton, and Sheppard.