The Isle of Pines, or, a late Discovery of a fourth Island near Terra Australis, Incognita Being A True Relation of certain English persons, who in the dayes of Queen Elizabeth, making a Voyage to the East Indies, were cast away, and wracked Upon the Island near to the Coast of Terra Australis, Incognita, and all drowned, except one Man and four Women whereof one was a Negro. And now lately Anno Dom. 1667. a Dutch Ship driven by foul weather there, by chance have found their Posterity, (speaking good English) to amount to ten or twelve thousand persons, as they suppose. The whole Relation follows, written, and left by the Man himself a little before his death, and delivered to the Dutch by his Grandchild. Licensed June 27, 1668

TitleThe Isle of Pines, or, a late Discovery of a fourth Island near Terra Australis, Incognita Being A True Relation of certain English persons, who in the dayes of Queen Elizabeth, making a Voyage to the East Indies, were cast away, and wracked Upon the Island near to the Coast of Terra Australis, Incognita, and all drowned, except one Man and four Women whereof one was a Negro. And now lately Anno Dom. 1667. a Dutch Ship driven by foul weather there, by chance have found their Posterity, (speaking good English) to amount to ten or twelve thousand persons, as they suppose. The whole Relation follows, written, and left by the Man himself a little before his death, and delivered to the Dutch by his Grandchild. Licensed June 27, 1668
Year for Search1668
Authors[Neville], [Henry](1620-94)
Tertiary AuthorsHenry Cornelius Van Sloetten [pseud.]
Date Published1668
PublisherPtd. by S.G. for Allen Banks and Charles Harper
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

One man and four women shipwrecked on a beautiful island. They establish political and religious order based on European forms. This is followed, in the part that was originally A New and further Discovery of The Isle of Pines, by a period of “whoredoms, incest and adulteries” followed by the imposition of harsh laws.

Additional Publishers

This nine page pamphlet was followed shortly by A New and further Discovery of The Isle of Pines In A Letter from Cornelius Van Sloetten [pseud.] a Dutch-man (who first discovered the same in the Year, 1667.) to a Friend of his in London. With a Relation of his voyage to the East Indies. Wherein Is declared how he happened to come thither, the Scituation of the Country, the temperature of the Climate, the manners and conditions of the people that inhabit it; their Laws, Ordinances, and Ceremonies, their way of Marrying, Burying, &c. The Longitude and Latitude of the Island, the pleasantness and facility thereof, with other matters of concern. Licensed according to Order. London: Ptd. for Allen Bankes and Charles Harper, 1668. The two were combined and published together as The Isle of Pines, or, a late Discovery of a fourth Island near Terra Australis, Incognita, by Henry Cornelius Van Sloetten [pseud.] Wherein is contained, A True Relation of certain English persons, who in Queen Elizabeths time, making a Voyage to the East Indies were cast away, and wracked near to the Coast of Terra Australis, Incognita, and all drowned, except one Man and four Women. And now lately Anno Dom. 1667. a Dutch Ship making a Voyage to the East Indies, driven by foul weather there, by chance have found their Posterity, (speaking good English) to amount (as they suppose) to ten or twelve thousand persons. The whole Relation (written, and left by the Man himself a little before his death, and delivered to the Dutch by his Grandchild) is here annexed with the Longitude and Latitude of the Island, the scituation and felicity thereof, with other matter observable. Licensed July 27, 1668. London: Ptd. for Allen Banks and Charles Harper, 1668.

An extract was published anonymously as “An account of certain English people, who in the year 1569, making a voyage to the East-Indies, were away, and wracked Upon the Island near to the Coast of Terra Australis, Incognita, and all drowned, except one Man and four Women. Given by Cornelius van Sloetten, captain of a Dutch ship, which was driven there by foul weather, in the year 1667, who found their posterity (speaking good English) to the amount of 10 or 12 thousand souls.” The New-Haven Gazette and the Connecticut Magazine 1.29 (August 31, 1786): 222-24; The New-Haven Gazette 1.33 (December 23, 1794) [not found]; and The New Hampshire Mercury and General Advertiser 2:95 [sic. 94] (October 4, 1786): 1-2.

A fifty-one copy edition was published as The Isle of Pines. Katoomba, NSW, Australia: The Wayzgoose Press, 1991. One version is rpt. in Shorter Novels: Seventeenth Century. Ed. Philip Henderson (London: J. M. Dent, 1967), 225-43; and in [On Cover: Three Early Modern Utopias: Utopia New Atlantis The Isles of Pines]. Title Page: Thomas More Utopia Francis Bacon New Atlantis Henry Neville The Isle of Pines. Ed. Susan Bruce (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), 187-212 with “Explanatory Notes” 239-42. Another version, which includes part of A New and further Discovery of the Isle of Pines is rpt. in Restoration and Augustan British Utopias. Ed. Gregory Claeys (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2000), 113-30. Another rpt. can be found in “The Isles of Pines: Texts.” Utopian Studies 17.1 (2006): 20-75. Includes the July 27, 1668 English edition (25-51), “Novvelle Decovverte De L’Isle Pinés Située au delà de la ligne Æquinnoctiale Faite par vn nauire Hollandois L’an 1667. Paris: Sebastien-Mabre Cramoisy, 1668 known as the Cramoisy edition in both French and English trans. Christine Reno, Peter G. Sullivan and Vassar College students (53-61), the edition from The Grand Magazine of Universal Intelligence 1 ( August 1758): 394-96 (63-71), and notes on the Hollis edition of 1768 (73-75). There is a critical text in John Scheckter, The Isles of Pines, 1668. Henry Neville’s Uncertain Utopia (Farnham, Eng.: Ashgate, 2011), 13-30 with notes on the text 183-98.

Info Notes

For information on the early publishing history, see Worthington Chauncy Ford, The Isle of Pines 1668. A Essay in Bibliography. Boston, MA: The Club of Odd Volumes, 1920, which also reprints the book (49-70).

Holding Institutions

ATL, MH

Author Note

(1620-94)

Full Text

1668 [Neville, Henry] (1620-94). The Isle of Pines, or, a late Discovery of a fourth Island near Terra Australis, Incognita Being A True Relation of certain English persons, who in the dayes of Queen Elizabeth, making a Voyage to the East Indies, were cast away, and wracked Upon the Island near to the Coast of Terra Australis, Incognita, and all drowned, except one Man and four Women whereof one was a Negro. And now lately Anno Dom. 1667. a Dutch Ship driven by foul weather there, by chance have found their Posterity, (speaking good English) to amount to ten or twelve thousand persons, as they suppose. The whole Relation follows, written, and left by the Man himself a little before his death, and delivered to the Dutch by his Grandchild. Licensed June 27, 1668. London: Ptd. by S. G. for Allen Banks and Charles Harper. This nine page pamphlet was followed shortly by A New and further Discovery of The Isle of Pines In A Letter from Cornelius Van Sloetten [pseud.] a Dutch-man (who first discovered the same in the Year, 1667.) to a Friend of his in London. With a Relation of his voyage to the East Indies. Wherein Is declared how he happened to come thither, the Scituation of the Country, the temperature of the Climate, the manners and conditions of the people that inhabit it; their Laws, Ordinances, and Ceremonies, their way of Marrying, Burying, &c. The Longitude and Latitude of the Island, the pleasantness and facility thereof, with other matters of concern. Licensed according to Order. London: Ptd. for Allen Bankes and Charles Harper, 1668. The two were combined and published together as The Isle of Pines, or, a late Discovery of a fourth Island near Terra Australis, Incognita, by Henry Cornelius Van Sloetten [pseud.] Wherein is contained, A True Relation of certain English persons, who in Queen Elizabeths time, making a Voyage to the East Indies were cast away, and wracked near to the Coast of Terra Australis, Incognita, and all drowned, except one Man and four Women. And now lately Anno Dom. 1667. a Dutch Ship making a Voyage to the East Indies, driven by foul weather there, by chance have found their Posterity, (speaking good English) to amount (as they suppose) to ten or twelve thousand persons. The whole Relation (written, and left by the Man himself a little before his death, and delivered to the Dutch by his Grandchild) is here annexed with the Longitude and Latitude of the Island, the scituation and felicity thereof, with other matter observable. Licensed July 27, 1668. London: Ptd. for Allen Banks and Charles Harper, 1668. Versions of the first version were published in 1768 and 1834. An extract was published anonymously as “An account of certain English people, who in the year 1569, making a voyage to the East-Indies, were away, and wracked Upon the Island near to the Coast of Terra Australis, Incognita, and all drowned, except one Man and four Women. Given by Cornelius van Sloetten, captain of a Dutch ship, which was driven there by foul weather, in the year 1667, who found their posterity (speaking good English) to the amount of 10 or 12 thousand souls.” The New-Haven Gazette and the Connecticut Magazine 1.29 (August 31, 1786): 222-24; The New-Haven Gazette 1.33 (December 23, 1794) [not found]; and The New Hampshire Mercury and General Advertiser 2:95 [sic. 94] (October 4, 1786): 1-2. For information on the early publishing history, see Worthington Chauncy Ford, The Isle of Pines 1668. A Essay in Bibliography. Boston, MA: The Club of Odd Volumes, 1920, which also reprints the book (49-70). A fifty-one copy edition was published as The Isle of Pines. Katoomba, NSW, Australia: The Wayzgoose Press, 1991. One version is rpt. in Shorter Novels: Seventeenth Century. Ed. Philip Henderson (London: J. M. Dent, 1967), 225-43; and in [On Cover: Three Early Modern Utopias: Utopia New Atlantis The Isles of Pines]. Title Page: Thomas More Utopia Francis Bacon New Atlantis Henry Neville The Isle of Pines. Ed. Susan Bruce (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), 187-212 with “Explanatory Notes” 239-42. Another version, which includes part of A New and further Discovery of the Isle of Pines is rpt. in Restoration and Augustan British Utopias. Ed. Gregory Claeys (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2000), 113-30. Another rpt. can be found in “The Isles of Pines: Texts.” Utopian Studies 17.1 (2006): 20-75. Includes the July 27, 1668 English edition (25-51), “Novvelle Decovverte De L’Isle Pinés Située au delà de la ligne Æquinnoctiale Faite par vn nauire Hollandois L’an 1667. Paris: Sebastien-Mabre Cramoisy, 1668 known as the Cramoisy edition in both French and English trans. Christine Reno, Peter G. Sullivan and Vassar College students (53-61), the edition from The Grand Magazine of Universal Intelligence 1 ( August 1758): 394-96 (63-71), and notes on the Hollis edition of 1768 (73-75). There is a critical text in John Scheckter, The Isles of Pines, 1668. Henry Neville’s Uncertain Utopia (Farnham, Eng.: Ashgate, 2011), 13-30 with notes on the text 183-98. ATL, MH

One man and four women shipwrecked on a beautiful island. They establish political and religious order based on European forms. This is followed, in the part that was originally A New and further Discovery of The Isle of Pines, by a period of “whoredoms, incest and adulteries” followed by the imposition of harsh laws.