King Strut

TitleKing Strut
Year for Search1970
AuthorsStone, [Charles Sumner] Chuck(1924-2014)
Tertiary AuthorsStone, Chuck
Date Published1970
PublisherBobbs-Merrill
Place PublishedIndianapolis, IN
KeywordsAfrican American author, Male author
Annotation

Black revolution presented positively but with substantial satire directed at the way the political system functions, particularly its favoritism and corruption. The novel focuses on a black politician, Hiram Elliott Quinault, possibly based on Adam Clayton Powell (1908-72), who rises to a position of seniority in the House of Representatives. His rise leads to the inevitable backlash from the established white politicians, who uses every means available to demean and diminish him. When a group of black nationalists declare the independence of Blackland in Mississippi from the U.S. and ask Quinault to be their President, he accepts, is expelled from Congress, and assassinated. In retaliation, the black nationalists kill twelve Congressmen and wounding others. 

Info Notes

The author's papers are held at the Duke University Library

Holding Institutions

L, PSt

Author Note

The African-American author (1924-2014) was a journalist who edited the African American newspapers The New York Age, The Washington Afro-America, and The Chicago Defender, an editor and columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News, and a professor at the University of North Carolina. 

Full Text

1970 Stone, [Charles Sumner] Chuck (1924-2014). King Strut. Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill. L, PSt

Black revolution presented positively but with substantial satire directed at the way the political system functions, particularly its favoritism and corruption. The novel focuses on a black politician, Hiram Elliott Quinault, possibly based on Adam Clayton Powell (1908-72), who rises to a position of seniority in the House of Representatives. His rise leads to the inevitable backlash from the established white politicians, who uses every means available to demean and diminish him. When a group of black nationalists declare the independence of Blackland in Mississippi from the U.S. and ask Quinault to be their President, he accepts, is expelled from Congress, and assassinated. In retaliation, the black nationalists kill twelve Congressmen and wounding others. The African-American author was a journalist who edited the African American newspapers The New York Age, The Washington Afro-America, and The Chicago Defender, an editor and columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News, and a professor at the University of North Carolina. His papers are held at the Duke University Library.