The Last Days of the Sunshine People

TitleThe Last Days of the Sunshine People
Year for Search1978
Authors[Shears], [Carl Lee](1937-79)
Tertiary AuthorsSaggittarus [pseud.]
Pagination58 pp.
Date Published1978
PublisherNuclassics and Science Publishing
Place PublishedWashington, DC
KeywordsAfrican-American author, Male author
Annotation

A play about a plan to eliminate all Blacks in the U. S. showing the stages it goes through and the failure of Blacks to believe warnings. Closely related to his 1973 Count-Down to Black Genocide in that in both, a “Black Day” is proclaimed as a holiday to honor blacks, but it is actually the day on which the slaughter of blacks is to happen. At the end, some Blacks do come to believe the plan is real inspired by a man who has been given a book called The Code of the Black Brotherhood. These blacks decide to create a new nation, Afro-America, also mentioned in Count-Down to Black Genocide. See also 1971, 1974, and 1975 (2).

Title Note

The cover adds about The Beginning of the coming BLACK HOLOCAUST

Pseudonym

Saggittarus [pseud.]

Holding Institutions

DLC

Author Note

The African-American author (1937-79) was a physicist who turned to writing about social issues.

Full Text

1978 [Shears, Carl Lee] (1937-79). The Last Days of the Sunshine People [The cover adds about The Beginning of the coming BLACK HOLOCAUST]. By Saggittarus [pseud.]. Washington, DC: Nuclassics and Science Publishing. 58 pp. DLC

A play about a plan to eliminate all Blacks in the U. S. showing the stages it goes through and the failure of Blacks to believe warnings. Closely related to his 1973 Count-Down to Black Genocide in that in both, a “Black Day” is proclaimed as a holiday to honor blacks, but it is actually the day on which the slaughter of blacks is to happen. At the end, some Blacks do come to believe the plan is real inspired by a man who has been given a book called The Code of the Black Brotherhood. These blacks decide to create a new nation, Afro-America, also mentioned in Count-Down to Black Genocide. See also 1971, 1974, and 1975 (2). The African-American author was a physicist who turned to writing about social issues.