The Legal Revolution of 1902

TitleThe Legal Revolution of 1902
Year for Search1898
Authors[Wellman], [Bert J.]
Tertiary AuthorsA Law-abiding Revolutionist [pseud.]
Pagination334 pp.
Date Published1898
PublisherCharles H. Kerr
Place PublishedChicago, IL
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

Populist eutopia. The revolution takes place through calling a constitutional convention to amend the U. S. Constitution, with details given on the amendments. Direct election of the President, Vice-President, and Senate. Graduated income tax. Future amendments possible by a direct vote of the people. Proportional representation. All property held by an individual over $500,000  to revert to the government. Concern to create uniform laws across the country. Nationalization of agriculture with huge irrigated, technologically sophisticated farms.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. incorrectly attributed to William Stanley Child. New York: Arno Press and The New York Times, 1971.

Pseudonym

A Law-abiding Revolutionist [pseud.]

Holding Institutions

MoU-St, PSt, VUW

Full Text

1898 [Wellman, Bert J.]. The Legal Revolution of 1902. By A Law-abiding Revolutionist [pseud.]. Chicago, IL: Charles H. Kerr. 334 pp. Rpt. incorrectly attributed to William Stanley Child. New York: Arno Press and The New York Times, 1971. MoU-St, PSt, VUW

Populist eutopia. The revolution takes place through calling a constitutional convention to amend the U. S. Constitution, with details given on the amendments. Direct election of the President, Vice-President, and Senate. Graduated income tax. Future amendments possible by a direct vote of the people. Proportional representation. All property held by an individual over $500,000  to revert to the government. Concern to create uniform laws across the country. Nationalization of agriculture with huge irrigated, technologically sophisticated farms.