"Letter XV. For the Lewes Journal. A Midsummer-Night's Dream; or, a Trip to the Moon"

Title"Letter XV. For the Lewes Journal. A Midsummer-Night's Dream; or, a Trip to the Moon"
Year for Search1787
AuthorsMichell, Richard
Secondary TitleFugitive Pieces, on Various Subjects
Volume / Edition2 vols.
Pagination1: 84-91
Date Published1787
PublisherPtd. for the Author by W. and A. Lee
Place PublishedLewes, Eng.
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

The moon is described as having luxuriant parks, with lots of flowers and other natural and artificial beauties. The parks were filled with people “… variously engaged, but to appearances all equally happy.” Elegantly simple dress. Huge amphitheatre that can hold the entire population of the planet filled for the Autumn Festival to given thanks for the year’s productions. “The inhabitants of the Moon, Man, are perfect strangers to all those irregular, turbulent passions, in the gratification, instead of the government of which, you mortals are madly seeking happiness…” (89. Original emphasis). “… total absence of all the disorderly affections that torment the HUMAN breast” (89. Original emphasis). “The Lunarians are wiser, and better, and therefore happier beings than you are” (90. Original emphasis). 

Info Notes

Said to be be rpt. from the Lewes Journal, which would be the Sussex Weekly Advertiser, or, Lewes Journal.

Holding Institutions

PPA

Author Note

The author was a curate of Fristen and Eastead.

Full Text

1787 Michell, Richard. “Letter XV. For the Lewes Journal. A Midsummer-Night’s Dream; or, a Trip to the Moon.” Signed The Man of the Rocks. In his Fugitive Pieces, on Various Subjects. 2 vols. (Lewes, Eng.: Ptd. for the Author by W. and A. Lee, 1787), 1: 84-91. Said to be rpt. from the Lewes Journal, which would be the Sussex Weekly Advertiser, or, Lewes Journal. PPA

The moon is described as having luxuriant parks, with lots of flowers and other natural and artificial beauties. The parks were filled with people “… variously engaged, but to appearances all equally happy.” Elegantly simple dress. Huge amphitheatre that can hold the entire population of the planet filled for the Autumn Festival to given thanks for the year’s productions. “The inhabitants of the Moon, Man, are perfect strangers to all those irregular, turbulent passions, in the gratification, instead of the government of which, you mortals are madly seeking happiness…” (89. Original emphasis). “… total absence of all the disorderly affections that torment the HUMAN breast” (89. Original emphasis). “The Lunarians are wiser, and better, and therefore happier beings than you are” (90. Original emphasis). The author was a curate of Fristen and Eastead.