Libellus vere aureus nec minus salutaris quam festivus de optimo reip[ublicae] statu, deq[ue] noua Insula Vtopia

TitleLibellus vere aureus nec minus salutaris quam festivus de optimo reip[ublicae] statu, deq[ue] noua Insula Vtopia
Year for Search1516
AuthorsMore, Thomas (1478-1535)
Date Published[1516]
PublisherArte Theodorice Martini
Place Published[Louvain, Belgium]
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

The classic work presenting a better society on an isolated island and commenting on the current situation in England.

Additional Publishers

The first English translation was published as A Fruteful and Pleasaunt Worke of the Beste State of a Publyque weale, and of the newe yle called Vtopia. Trans. Ralphe Robynson. London: Ptd. by Abraham Vele, 1551. For early editions and translations, see R. W. Gibson, comp. St. Thomas More: A Preliminary Bibliography of His Works and Moreana to the Year 1750 (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1961), 3-57; and Constance Smith, An Updating of R. W. Gibson’s St. Thomas More: A Preliminary Bibliography. Sixteenth Century Bibliography, No. 20 (St. Louis, MO: Center for Reformation Research, 1981), 20-29. For a consideration of some translations, see Elizabeth McCutcheon, “Ten English Translations/Editions of Thomas More’s Utopia.” Utopian Studies 3.2 (1992): 102-20. Important recent eds. are Utopia. Vol. 4 of The Complete Works of St. Thomas More. Ed. Edward Surtz, S. J. and J. H. Hexter. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1965 [The trans. is based on the 1923 trans. by G. C. Richards] with an Introduction” by the editors (xv-cxciv), “Commentary” (255-70, 585), “More’s Visit to Antwerp in 1515” by Hexter (571-76), “Vocabulary and Diction in Utopia” by Surtz (577-82), and an Index (587-629); Utopia: Latin Text and English Translation. Ed. George M. Logan, Robert M. Adams, and Clarence M. Miller. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1995Utopia. Ed. and trans. David Wootton. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Co., 1999 with an “Introduction” by Wootton (1-37); “Utopia” in Thomas More Utopia Francis Bacon New Atlantis Henry Neville The Isle of Pines [On Cover: Three Early Modern Utopias: Utopia New Atlantis The Isles of Pines]. Ed. Susan Bruce (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), 1-148 with and “Introduction” to all three texts (ix-lxi) and “Explanatory Notes” to Utopia (213-31); Utopia. Trans. Paul Turner. Rev. ed. Harmondsworth, Eng.: Penguin Books, 2003 with an “Introduction” by Turner (xi-xxviii), “Appendix: More’s Attitude to Communism” (114-17), “Glossary” (118-20), and “Notes” (121-35); Utopia A Revised Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. 3rd ed. Ed. and with a rev. trans. by George M. Logan. New York: W. W. Norton, 2011Utopia. Trans. and ed. by Dominic Baker-Smith. London: Penguin Books, 2012 with an “Introduction” by the editor (xi-xxxix), “Appendix 1 ‘Between friends all is common’ (123-25), “Appendix 2 An Account of the Taíno People” (127-29), “Glossary of Names: (131-32), and “Notes” (132-46); as Open/Utopia. Ed. Stephen Duncome. Brooklyn, NY: Autonomedia, 2012, with an editor’s “Preface Intellectual Commons” (v-vii), “Introduction” (ix-lxv), a “Cast of Contributors” (23-34), “Sources’ (235-40), footnotes throughout the text, and the translation is “assembled from translations and editions of More’s Utopia that are in the public domain (v); Utopia. Ed. George M. Logan and trans. Robert M. Adams. 3rd ed. Cambridge Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2016, with “Ancillary materials from the first four editions: (114-35), introductory material by the editor (vii-xli), and an “index” (136-41). ; an as Utopia The Island of Nowhere. Trans. Roger Clarke. Richmond, Eng.: Alma Classics, 2017, with “A Pen Portrait of Thomas More by His Friend Desiderius Erasmus” (vii-xvii), “Correspondence Relevant to Utopia and Other Contributions from More’s Contemporaries” (133-92), “Index  of Contemporary Europeans Mentioned in Utopia and Related Documents” (193-205), “Index of Utopian and Other Exotic Names” (206-208), “Notes” (209-44), and “Extra Material on Thomas More’s Utopia (245-65). An edition using a 1901 translation by Gilbert Burnet (London: Verso, 2016), includes an “Introduction” by China Miéville (1-27), part of which, “The Limits of Utopia” (11-27) was originally published in Salvage #1: Amid This Story Rubbish (2015) and essays by Ursula K. Le Guin (161-216), parts of which were originally published  as “A Non-Euclidian View of California as a Cold Place To Be (1982).” The Yale Review 72 (Winter 1983): 161-80, Rpt. with (1983) at the end of the title in her Dancing at the Edge of the World: Thoughts on Words, Women, Places (New York: Grove Press, 1989), 80-100; and “The Operating Instructions.” The Wave in the Mind: Talks and Essays on the Writer, the Reader, and the Imagination (Boston, MA: Shambhala, 2004), 206-10. [Book Two] rpt. with no indication of the translation used in Dystopia Utopia Short Stories: An Anthology of New & Classic Tales (London: Flame Tree Publishing, 2016), 231-91

Info Notes

The third ed. has the variant title–De optimo reip[ublicae] statu, deque nova Insula Utopia, libellus vere aureus, nec minus salutaris quam festiuus clarissimi disertissimique. Basle, Switzerland: Io Frobenium, 1518

See Albert J. Geritz, comp. “Utopia.” Thomas More: An Annotated Bibliography of Criticism, 1935-1997 (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1998), 215-309; and Michael D. Wentworth, “Utopia.” The Essential Thomas More: An Annotated Bibliography of Major Modern Studies (New York: G. K. Hall, 1995, 144-251. The best overall bibliography is by Romuald I. Lakowski, The International Thomas More Bibliography, who completed it through 2017, and is now on line at https://essentialmore.org/bibliographies/ where it is being annually updated by the Center for Thomas More Studies. 

Translation Note

The first English translation was published as A Fruteful and Pleasaunt Worke of the Beste State of a Publyque weale, and of the newe yle called Vtopia. Trans. Ralphe Robynson. London: Ptd. by Abraham Vele, 1551. Important recent eds. are Utopia. Vol. 4 of The Complete Works of St. Thomas More. Ed. Edward Surtz, S. J. and J. H. Hexter. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1965 [The trans. is based on the 1923 trans. by G. C. Richards] with an Introduction” by the editors (xv-cxciv), “Commentary” (255-70, 585), “More’s Visit to Antwerp in 1515” by Hexter (571-76), “Vocabulary and Diction in Utopia” by Surtz (577-82), and an Index (587-629); Utopia: Latin Text and English Translation. Ed. George M. Logan, Robert M. Adams, and Clarence M. Miller. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1995Utopia. Ed. and trans. David Wootton. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Co., 1999 with an “Introduction” by Wootton (1-37); “Utopia” in Thomas More Utopia Francis Bacon New Atlantis Henry Neville The Isle of Pines [On Cover: Three Early Modern Utopias: Utopia New Atlantis The Isles of Pines]. Ed. Susan Bruce (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), 1-148 with and “Introduction” to all three texts (ix-lxi) and “Explanatory Notes” to Utopia (213-31); Utopia. Trans. Paul Turner. Rev. ed. Harmondsworth, Eng.: Penguin Books, 2003 with an “Introduction” by Turner (xi-xxviii), “Appendix: More’s Attitude to Communism” (114-17), “Glossary” (118-20), and “Notes” (121-35); Utopia A Revised Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. 3rd ed. Ed. and with a rev. trans. by George M. Logan. New York: W. W. Norton, 2011Utopia. Trans. and ed. by Dominic Baker-Smith. London: Penguin Books, 2012 with an “Introduction” by the editor (xi-xxxix), “Appendix 1 ‘Between friends all is common’ (123-25), “Appendix 2 An Account of the Taíno People” (127-29), “Glossary of Names: (131-32), and “Notes” (132-46); Utopia. Ed. George M. Logan and trans. Robert M. Adams. 3rd ed. Cambridge Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2016, with “Ancillary materials from the first four editions: (114-35), introductory material by the editor (vii-xli), and an “index” (136-41); and as Utopia The Island of Nowhere. Trans. Roger Clarke. Richmond, Eng.: Alma Classics, 2017, with “A Pen Portrait of Thomas More by His Friend Desiderius Erasmus” (vii-xvii), “Correspondence Relevant to Utopia and Other Contributions from More’s Contemporaries” (133-92), “Index  of Contemporary Europeans Mentioned in Utopia and Related Documents” (193-205), “Index of Utopian and Other Exotic Names” (206-208), “Notes” (209-44), and “Extra Material on Thomas More’s Utopia (245-65). An edition using a 1901 translation by Gilbert Burnet (London: Verso, 2016), includes an “Introduction” by China Miéville (1-27), part of which, “The Limits of Utopia” (11-27) was originally published in Salvage #1: Amid This Story Rubbish (2015) and essays by Ursula K. Le Guin (161-216), parts of which were originally published as “A Non-Euclidian View of California as a Cold Place To Be .” The Yale Review 72 (Winter 1983): 161-80. Rpt. with (1983) at the end of the title in her Dancing at the Edge of the World: Thoughts on Words, Women, Places (New York: Grove Press, 1989), 80-100; and “The Operating Instructions.” The Wave in the Mind: Talks and Essays on the Writer, the Reader, and the Imagination (Boston, MA: Shambhala, 2004), 206-10. [Book Two] rpt. with no indication of the translation used in Dystopia Utopia Short Stories: An Anthology of New & Classic Tales (London: Flame Tree Publishing, 2016), 231-91

Holding Institutions

C, PSt

Author Note

(1478-1535)

Full Text

[1516] More, Thomas (1478-1535). Libellus vere aureus nec minus salutaris quam festivus de optimo reip[ublicae] statu, deq[ue] noua Insula Vtopia. [Louvain, Belgium]: Arte Theodorice Martini. The third ed. has the variant title–De optimo reip[ublicae] statu, deque nova Insula Utopia, libellus vere aureus, nec minus salutaris quam festiuus clarissimi disertissimique. Basle, Switzerland: Io Frobenium, 1518. The first English translation was published as A Fruteful and Pleasaunt Worke of the Beste State of a Publyque weale, and of the newe yle called Vtopia. Trans. Ralphe Robynson. London: Ptd. by Abraham Vele, 1551. For early editions and translations, see R. W. Gibson, comp. St. Thomas More: A Preliminary Bibliography of His Works and Moreana to the Year 1750 (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1961), 3-57; and Constance Smith, An Updating of R. W. Gibson’s St. Thomas More: A Preliminary Bibliography. Sixteenth Century Bibliography, No. 20 (St. Louis, MO: Center for Reformation Research, 1981), 20-29. For a consideration of some translations, see Elizabeth McCutcheon, “Ten English Translations/Editions of Thomas More’s Utopia.” Utopian Studies 3.2 (1992): 102-20. Important recent eds. are Utopia. Vol. 4 of The Complete Works of St. Thomas More. Ed. Edward Surtz, S. J. and J. H. Hexter. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1965 [The trans. is based on the 1923 trans. by G. C. Richards] with an Introduction” by the editors (xv-cxciv), “Commentary” (255-70, 585), “More’s Visit to Antwerp in 1515” by Hexter (571-76), “Vocabulary and Diction in Utopia” by Surtz (577-82), and an Index (587-629; Utopia: Latin Text and English Translation. Ed. George M. Logan, Robert M. Adams, and Clarence M. Miller. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1995; Utopia. Ed. and trans. David Wootton. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Co., 1999 with an “Introduction” by Wootton (1-37); “Utopia” in Thomas More Utopia Francis Bacon New Atlantis Henry Neville The Isle of Pines [On Cover: Three Early Modern Utopias: Utopia New Atlantis The Isles of Pines]. Ed. Susan Bruce (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), 1-148 with and “Introduction” to all three texts (ix-lxi) and “Explanatory Notes” to Utopia (213-31); Utopia. Trans. Paul Turner. Rev. ed. Harmondsworth, Eng.: Penguin Books, 2003 with an “Introduction” by Turner (xi-xxviii), “Appendix: More’s Attitude to Communism” (114-17), “Glossary” (118-20), and “Notes” (121-35); Utopia A Revised Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. 3rd ed. Ed. and with a rev. trans. by George M. Logan. New York: W. W. Norton, 2011; Utopia. Trans. and ed. by Dominic Baker-Smith. London: Penguin Books, 2012 with an “Introduction” by the editor (xi-xxxix), “Appendix 1 ‘Between friends all is common’ (123-25), “Appendix 2 An Account of the Taíno People” (127-29), “Glossary of Names: (131-32), and “Notes” (132-46); as Open/Utopia. Ed. Stephen Duncome. Brooklyn, NY: Autonomedia, 2012, with an editor’s “Preface Intellectual Commons” (v-vii), “Introduction” (ix-lxv), a “Cast of Contributors” (23-34), “Sources’ (235-40), footnotes throughout the text, and the translation is “assembled from translations and editions of More’s Utopia that are in the public domain (v); Utopia. Ed. George M. Logan and trans. Robert M. Adams. 3rd ed. Cambridge Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2016, with “Ancillary materials from the first four editions: (114-35), introductory material by the editor (vii-xli), and an “index” (136-41); and as Utopia The Island of Nowhere. Trans. Roger Clarke. Richmond, Eng.: Alma Classics, 2017, with “A Pen Portrait of Thomas More by His Friend Desiderius Erasmus” (vii-xvii), “Correspondence Relevant to Utopia and Other Contributions from More’s Contemporaries” (133-92), “Index  of Contemporary Europeans Mentioned in Utopia and Related Documents” (193-205), “Index of Utopian and Other Exotic Names” (206-208), “Notes” (209-44), and “Extra Material on Thomas More’s Utopia (245-65). An edition using a 1901 translation by Gilbert Burnet (London: Verso, 2016), includes an “Introduction” by China Miéville (1-27), part of which, “The Limits of Utopia” (11-27) was originally published in Salvage #1: Amid This Story Rubbish (2015) and essays by Ursula K. Le Guin (161-216), parts of which were originally published as “A Non-Euclidian View of California as a Cold Place To Be.” The Yale Review 72 (Winter 1983): 161-80. Rpt. with (1983) at the end of the title in her Dancing at the Edge of the World: Thoughts on Words, Women, Places (New York: Grove Press, 1989), 80-100; and “The Operating Instructions.” The Wave in the Mind: Talks and Essays on the Writer, the Reader, and the Imagination (Boston, MA: Shambhala, 2004), 206-10. [Book Two] rpt. with no indication of the translation used in Dystopia Utopia Short Stories: An Anthology of New & Classic Tales (London: Flame Tree Publishing, 2016), 231-91. See Albert J. Geritz, comp. “Utopia.” Thomas More: An Annotated Bibliography of Criticism, 1935-1997 (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1998), 215-309; and Michael D. Wentworth, “Utopia.” The Essential Thomas More: An Annotated Bibliography of Major Modern Studies (New York: G. K. Hall, 1995, 144-251. The best overall bibliography is by Romuald I. Lakowski, The International Thomas More Bibliography, who completed it through 2017, and now is on line at https://essentialmore.org/bibliographies/ where it is being annually updated by the Center for Thomas More Studies. C, PSt

The classic work presenting a better society on an isolated island and commenting on the current situation in England.