"The Man Machine; or, the Pupil of 'Circumstances'"

Title"The Man Machine; or, the Pupil of 'Circumstances'"
Year for Search1826
Authors[Paulding], [James Kirke](1778-1860)
Secondary AuthorsAuthor of John Bull in America [pseud.]
Secondary TitleThe Merry Tales of the Three Wise Men of Gotham
Pagination21-142
Date Published1826
PublisherG. and C. Carvill
Place PublishedNew York
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

Dystopia attacking Robert Owen (1771-1858) citing his New View of Society (1813). A cotton mill run on what are described as Owen’s principles is designed to treat the “Man Machine”, including children, in such a way as to produce the greatest profits for the proprietor. Equality was the rule and care was provided for children and seniors. Life was machine-like with everyone working long hours and eating and sleeping on schedule. But “human nature” manifested itself in pride and envy. The story then traces other failed attempts to apply Owen’s principles. The stories told by the second and third wise men of Gotham, “The Perfection of Reason” (143-233) and “The Perfection of Science” (235-324), present other failed attempts at human betterment.

Pseudonym

Ed. by the Author of John Bull in America [pseud.]

Holding Institutions

L, PSt, W1,2015

Author Note

The author (1778-1860) was U. S. Secretary of the Navy from 1838 to 1841.

Full Text

1826 [Paulding, James Kirke] (1778-1860). “The Man Machine; or, the Pupil of ‘Circumstances’.” In his The Merry Tales of the Three Wise Men of Gotham. Ed. by the Author of John Bull in America [pseud.] (New York: G. and C. Carvill, 1826), 21-142. L, PSt, W1,2015

Dystopia attacking Robert Owen (1771-1858) citing his New View of Society (1813). A cotton mill run on what are described as Owen’s principles is designed to treat the “Man Machine”, including children, in such a way as to produce the greatest profits for the proprietor. Equality was the rule and care was provided for children and seniors. Life was machine-like with everyone working long hours and eating and sleeping on schedule. But “human nature” manifested itself in pride and envy. The story then traces other failed attempts to apply Owen’s principles. The stories told by the second and third wise men of Gotham, “The Perfection of Reason” (143-233) and “The Perfection of Science” (235-324), present other failed attempts at human betterment.