"The Messiah of the Cylinder"

Title"The Messiah of the Cylinder"
Year for Search1917
Authors[Emanuel], [Avigdor Rousseau](1879-1960)
Tertiary AuthorsEmanuel, Victor Rousseau, and Victor Rousseau [pseud.]
Secondary TitleEverybody's Magazine
Volume / Edition36 - 37
Pagination657-77; 65-84, 176, 95, 335-54
Date PublishedJune - September 1917
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

Scientific dystopia. A leader uses science and religion to take control of the world. A successful revolt frees people and the ending suggests that a better world is being created.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. illus. Joseph Clement Coll. Chicago, IL: A .C. McClurg & Co., 1917; and illus. Joseph Clement Coll. Westport, CT: Hyperion Press, 1974, with an unpaged introduction, “A Neglected Masterpiece,” by Lester Del Rey, who characterizes it as an “anti-utopia (or dystopia,” written in opposition to H. G. Wells. U. K. ed. without the illus. as The Apostle of the Cylinder. London: Hodder and Stoughton, [1918]. A few libraries catalog the U. K. ed. as [1919?]. 

Pseudonym

Victor Rousseau [pseud.]

Holding Institutions

L, O, PSt

Author Note

The author (1879-1960) was born Avigdor Rousseau Emanuel in the U. K. and also lived in the U. S. off and on from 1901 and Canada (1912-1916). He signed many books as V. R. Rousseau, and his name is often given as Victor Rousseau Emanuel.

Full Text

1917 [Emanuel, Avigdor Rousseau] (1879-1960).The Messiah of the Cylinder.” By Victor Rousseau [pseud.]. Illus. Joseph Clement Coll. Everybody’s Magazine 36 - 37 (June - September 1917): 657-77; 65-84, 176-95, 335-54. Rpt. illus. Joseph Clement Coll. Chicago, IL: A .C. McClurg & Co., 1917; and illus. Joseph Clement Coll. Westport, CT: Hyperion Press, 1974, with an unpaged introduction, “A Neglected Masterpiece,” by Lester Del Rey, who characterizes it as an “anti-utopia (or dystopia,” written in opposition to H. G. Wells. U. K. ed. without the illus. as The Apostle of the Cylinder. London: Hodder and Stoughton, [1918]. A few libraries catalog the U. K. ed. as [1919?]. L, O, PSt

Scientific dystopia. A leader uses science and religion to take control of the world. A successful revolt frees people and the ending suggests that a better world is being created. The author was born Avigdor Rousseau Emanuel in London and also lived in the U. S. off and on from 1901 and Canada (1912-1916). He signed many books as V. R. Rousseau, and his name is often given as Victor Rousseau Emanuel.