New Atlantis. Begun by the Lord Verulam, Viscount St. Albans: and Continued by R.H. Esquire. Wherein is set forth a Platform of Monarchical Government. With A Pleasant intermixture of divers rare Inventions, and wholsom customs, fit to be introduced into all Kingdoms, States, and Common-Wealths

TitleNew Atlantis. Begun by the Lord Verulam, Viscount St. Albans: and Continued by R.H. Esquire. Wherein is set forth a Platform of Monarchical Government. With A Pleasant intermixture of divers rare Inventions, and wholsom customs, fit to be introduced into all Kingdoms, States, and Common-Wealths
Year for Search1660
AuthorsH., R. Esquire [pseud.]
Date Published1660
PublisherPtd. for John Crooke
Place PublishedLondon
Annotation

Eutopia of the Restoration. Monarchy with laws that are “… easy, plain, and all writ in our native language…” (18). Religion and education are emphasized. Ten percent of all children are chosen for the church. No poor because all parents must teach their children a trade, and also how to read, shoot and swim.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. Los Angeles, CA: Philosophical Research Society, 1985; and in Restoration and Augustan British Utopias. Ed. Gregory Claeys (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2000), 3-51.

Info Notes

Claeys suggests that the author was Richard Hawkins. Richard Haines, Robert Harley, Robert Heath, Richard Harris, Robert Harris, Robert Hooke, and Henry Robinson have also been suggested. All of these are rejected in J[ames] C[olin] Davis, Utopia and the Ideal Society: A Study of English Utopian Writing 1516-1700 (Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1981), 280n4.

Holding Institutions

CSmH, L

Full Text

1660 H., R., Esquire [pseud.]. New Atlantis. Begun by the Lord Verulam, Viscount St. Albans: and Continued by R. H. Esquire. Wherein is set forth a Platform of Monarchical Government. With A Pleasant intermixture of divers rare Inventions, and wholsom customs, fit to be introduced into all Kingdoms, States, and Common-Wealths. London: Ptd. for John Crooke. Rpt. Los Angeles, CA: Philosophical Research Society, 1985; and in Restoration and Augustan British Utopias. Ed. Gregory Claeys (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2000), 3-51. Claeys suggests that the author was Richard Hawkins. Richard Haines, Robert Harley, Robert Heath, Richard Harris, Robert Harris, Robert Hooke, and Henry Robinson have also been suggested. All of these are rejected in J[ames] C[olin] Davis, Utopia and the Ideal Society: A Study of English Utopian Writing 1516-1700 (Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1981), 280n4. CSmH, L

Eutopia of the Restoration. Monarchy with laws that are “… easy, plain, and all writ in our native language…” (18). Religion and education are emphasized. Ten percent of all children are chosen for the church. No poor because all parents must teach their children a trade, and also how to read, shoot and swim.