A Page of American History. Constitution of the United States of the World. An Address by Victoria C. Woodhull. Delivered in Lincoln Hall, Washington, U.S.A., in 1870. The First Suggestion of its kind made in America, and commented on widely by the Press

TitleA Page of American History. Constitution of the United States of the World. An Address by Victoria C. Woodhull. Delivered in Lincoln Hall, Washington, U.S.A., in 1870. The First Suggestion of its kind made in America, and commented on widely by the Press
Year for Search1870
AuthorsWoodhull, Victoria C[alifornia](1838-1927)
Date Published[1870]
PublisherNorman, Sawyer
Place PublishedCheltenham, Eng.
KeywordsEnglish author, Female author, US author
Annotation

Eutopia presented through a detailed constitution, which the title suggests is to be world-wide but the details of which are limited to the U. S. The basic governmental structure is similar to that in effect in the U. S. at the time. The Constitution is egalitarian, with the only division of the population is that between adults, those eighteen and over, and minors. All over eighteen can vote with minor residence requirements. See also 1890 Martin and Victoria C. Woodhull, A Speech on The Garden of Eden; or, Paradise Lost and Found, delivered at Cooper Institute, New York City, December 30, 1875. New York: Woodhull & Claflin, 1876. A statement of the equality of the sexes. A completely different version was published in her Victoria C. Woodhull’s Life Sketches. Np: np, nd.  Their The Garden of Eden; or, The Paradise Lost and Found is a commentary on Genesis and Revelations on women with a brief comparison to the Vedas

Additional Publishers

Rpt. in The Victoria Woodhull Reader. Ed. Madeleine B. Stern. Weston, MA: M S Press, 1974. [Items are separately paged]. Rpt. slightly rev. as A New Constitution for the United States of the World Proposed for the Consideration of the Constructors of Our Future Government. New York: Woodhull, Claflin & Co., 1872. Rpt. in We, the Other People: Alternative Declarations of Independence By Labor Groups, Farmers, Woman’s Rights Advocates, Socialists, and Blacks, 1829-1975. Ed. Philip S. Foner (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1976), 177-201 with an editor’s introduction (177-80). 

Holding Institutions

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Author Note

The female author (1838-1927) was born in the U. S. and lived there until 1877 when she moved to England.

Full Text

[1870] Woodhull, Victoria C. (1838-1927). A Page of American History. Constitution of the United States of the World. An Address by Victoria C. Woodhull. Delivered in Lincoln Hall, Washington, U. S.A., in 1870. The First Suggestion of its kind made in America, and commented on widely by the Press. Cheltenham, Eng.: Norman, Sawyer. Rpt. in The Victoria Woodhull Reader. Ed. Madeleine B. Stern. Weston, MA: M S Press, 1974. [Items are separately paged]. Rpt. slightly rev. as A New Constitution for the United States of the World Proposed for the Consideration of the Constructors of Our Future Government. New York: Woodhull, Claflin & Co., 1872. Rpt. in We, the Other People: Alternative Declarations of Independence By Labor Groups, Farmers, Woman’s Rights Advocates, Socialists, and Blacks, 1829-1975. Ed. Philip S. Foner (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1976), 177-201 with an editor’s introduction (177-80). PSt

Eutopia presented through a detailed constitution, which the title suggests is to be world-wide but the details of which are limited to the U. S. The basic governmental structure is similar to that in effect in the U. S. at the time. The Constitution is egalitarian, with the only division of the population is that between adults, those eighteen and over, and minors. All over eighteen can vote with minor residence requirements. See also 1890 Martin and Victoria C. Woodhull, A Speech on The Garden of Eden; or, Paradise Lost and Found, delivered at Cooper Institute, New York City, December 30, 1875. New York: Woodhull & Claflin, 1876. A statement of the equality of the sexes. A completely different version was published in her Victoria C. Woodhull’s Life Sketches. Np: np, nd. Their The Garden of Eden; or, The Paradise Lost and Found is a commentary on Genesis and Revelations on women with a brief comparison to the Vedas. The female author was born in the U. S. and lived there until 1877 when she moved to England.