Papa's Own Girl

TitlePapa's Own Girl
Year for Search1874
AuthorsHowland, Marie [Stevens Case](1836-1921)
Date Published1874
PublisherJohn P. Jewett
Place PublishedNew York
KeywordsFemale author, US author
Annotation

Eutopia. The two titles reflect the two main themes of the novel. Papa’s Own Girl reflects the desire of one of the main characters that his daughter grow up as a strong, independent woman, and she does. The Familistere is the name of the community in Guise, France, founded by Jean Baptiste André Godin (1817-88), which is the basis of the intentional community that is the other focus of the novel.

Additional Publishers

2nd ed. New York: John P. Jewett, [1885]. Later ed. entitled The Familistere. A Novel. 3rd ed. Boston, MA: Christopher Publishing House, 1918. Rpt. Philadelphia, PA: Porcupine Press, 1975 with an Introduction entitled “The Familistere: Radical Reform Through Cooperative Enterprise” (unpaged) by Robert S. Fogarty. Selections rpt. in Daring To Dream: Utopian Stories by United States Women, 1836-1919. Ed. Carol Farley Kessler (London: Pandora Press, 1984), 98-103 with an editor’s note on 95-97; and different selections rpt. in Daring To Dream: Utopian Stories By United States Women Before 1950. Ed. Carol Farley Kessler. 2nd ed. (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1995), 71-93.

Title Note

Later ed. entitled The Familistere. A Novel.

Holding Institutions

L, MoU-St, PSt, W2,1290

Author Note

The female author (1836-1921) was a member of the Fourierist community at Guise, France, the Topolobampo community in Mexico, and the Fairhope single tax community in Alabama.

Full Text

1874 Howland, Marie [Stevens Case] (1836-1921). Papa’s Own Girl. New York: John P. Jewett. 2nd ed. New York: John P. Jewett, [1885]. Later ed. entitled The Familistere. A Novel. 3rd ed. Boston, MA: Christopher Publishing House, 1918. Rpt. Philadelphia, PA: Porcupine Press, 1975 with an Introduction entitled “The Familistere: Radical Reform Through Cooperative Enterprise” (unpaged) by Robert S. Fogarty. Selections rpt. in Daring To Dream: Utopian Stories by United States Women, 1836-1919. Ed. Carol Farley Kessler (London: Pandora Press, 1984), 98-103 with an editor’s note on 95-97; and different selections rpt. in Daring To Dream: Utopian Stories By United States Women Before 1950. Ed. Carol Farley Kessler. 2nd ed. (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1995), 71-93. L, MoU-St, PSt, W2,1290

Eutopia. The two titles reflect the two main themes of the novel. Papa’s Own Girl reflects the desire of one of the main characters that his daughter grow up as a strong, independent woman, and she does. The Familistere is the name of the community in Guise, France, founded by Jean Baptiste André Godin (1817-88), which is the basis of the intentional community that is the other focus of the novel. The author was a member of the Fourierist community at Guise, France, the Topolobampo community in Mexico, and the Fairhope single tax community in Alabama. Female author.