A Plan for the Establishment of Public Schools and the Diffusion of Knowledge in Pennsylvania to which are added thoughts upon the mode of education, proper in a republic. Addressed to the Legislature and Citizens of the State

TitleA Plan for the Establishment of Public Schools and the Diffusion of Knowledge in Pennsylvania to which are added thoughts upon the mode of education, proper in a republic. Addressed to the Legislature and Citizens of the State
Year for Search1786
Authors[Rush], [Benjamin](1745-1813)
Secondary TitleA Plan for the Establishment of Public Schools and the Diffusion of Knowledge in Pennsylvania to which are added thoughts upon the mode of education, proper in a republic. Addressed to the Legislature and Citizens of the State
Pagination3-12
Date Published1786
PublisherPtd. for Thomas Dobson
Place PublishedPhiladelphia, PA
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

A detailed proposal for a eutopian public school system, saying that it supports religion, liberty, “just ideas of law and government,” manners, agriculture, and manufacturing (1). It then proposes one university in each state, located in its capital. For Pennsylvania he proposes four colleges in Philadelphia, Carlisle, Lancaster, “for the benefit of our German fellow citizens,” and one, in the future, in Pittsburg (2). Also, there should be a free school in every township where children learn to “read and write the English and German languages, and the use of figures” (2). Rush wrote numerous essays on aspects of education, including “Thoughts upon the Mode of Education proper in a Republic.” In his A Plan for the Establishment of Public Schools and the Diffusion of Knowledge in Pennsylvania to which are added thoughts upon the mode of education, proper in a republic. Addressed to the Legislature and Citizens of the State. Philadelphia, PA: Ptd. for Thomas Dobson, 1786), 13-36; “Thoughts upon Female Education, Accommodated to the Present State of Society, Manners, and Government, in the United States of America. Addressed to the Visitors of the Young Ladies Academy in Philadelphia, 28th July, 1787, at the Close of the Quarterly Examination, and Afterwards Published at the Request of the Visitors” his Essays Literary, Moral and Philosophical. (Philadelphia, PA: Thomas and Samuel F. Bradford, 1798), 75-92. 2nd ed. with additions (Philadelphia, PA: Thomas and Samuel F. Bradford, 1806), 75-92. Rpt. ed. Michael Meranze (Schenectady, NY: Union College Press, 1988), 44-54; “An Enquiry into the Utility of a Knowledge of the Latin and Greek Languages, as a branch of liberal education, with hints of a plan of liberal instruction, without them, accommodated to the present state of society, manners, and government in the United States.” By a Citizen of Philadelphia [pseud.]. American Museum, or Universal Magazine 5 (June 1789): 525-35; “Plan for a Federal University.” By Citizen of Pennsylvania [pseud.]. Federal Gazette and Philadelphia Evening Post, no. 25 (October 29, 1788): 2-3; and “Letter to Richard Price May 15, 1786.” Letters of Benjamin Rush. Volume I: 1761-1792. Ed. L. H. Butterfield ([Philadelphia, PA]: The American Philosophical Society by Princeton University Press, 1951), 388-90.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. in the Pennsylvania Gazette (Philadelphia, PA), no. 2919 (May 10, 1786): 1-2; and as “A Plan for Establishing Public Schools in Pennsylvania, and for conducting education agreeably to a Republican form of Government. Addressed to the Legislature and citizens of Pennsylvania, in the Year 1786.” In his Essays Literary, Moral and Philosophical (Philadelphia, PA: Thomas and Samuel F. Bradford, 1798), 1-6; 2nd ed. with additions (Philadelphia, PA: Thomas and Samuel F. Bradford, 1806), 1-6; rpt. ed. Michael Meranze (Schenectady, NY: Union College Press, 1988), 1-4. Also rpt. as “Education Agreeable to a Republican Form of Government.” In The Selected Writings of Benjamin Rush. Ed. Dagobert D. Runes (New York: Philosophical Library, 1947), 97-100

Info Notes

Rush wrote numerous essays on aspects of education, including “Thoughts upon the Mode of Education proper in a Republic.” In his A Plan for the Establishment of Public Schools and the Diffusion of Knowledge in Pennsylvania to which are added thoughts upon the mode of education, proper in a republic. Addressed to the Legislature and Citizens of the State. Philadelphia, PA: Ptd. for Thomas Dobson, 1786), 13-36; “Thoughts upon Female Education, Accommodated to the Present State of Society, Manners, and Government, in the United States of America. Addressed to the Visitors of the Young Ladies Academy in Philadelphia, 28th July, 1787, at the Close of the Quarterly Examination, and Afterwards Published at the Request of the Visitors” his Essays Literary, Moral and Philosophical. (Philadelphia, PA: Thomas and Samuel F. Bradford, 1798), 75-92. 2nd ed. with additions (Philadelphia, PA: Thomas and Samuel F. Bradford, 1806), 75-92. Rpt. ed. Michael Meranze (Schenectady, NY: Union College Press, 1988), 44-54; “An Enquiry into the Utility of a Knowledge of the Latin and Greek Languages, as a branch of liberal education, with hints of a plan of liberal instruction, without them, accommodated to the present state of society, manners, and government in the United States.” By a Citizen of Philadelphia [pseud.]. American Museum, or Universal Magazine 5 (June 1789): 525-35; “Plan for a Federal University.” By Citizen of Pennsylvania [pseud.]. Federal Gazette and Philadelphia Evening Post, no. 25 (October 29, 1788): 2-3; and “Letter to Richard Price May 15, 1786.” Letters of Benjamin Rush. Volume I: 1761-1792. Ed. L. H. Butterfield ([Philadelphia, PA]: The American Philosophical Society by Princeton University Press, 1951), 388-90.

Title Note

“A Plan for Establishing Public Schools in Pennsylvania, and for conducting education agreeably to a Republican form of Government. Addressed to the Legislature and citizens of Pennsylvania, in the Year 1786” 

Holding Institutions

PSt

Author Note

(1745-1813)

Full Text

1786 [Rush, Benjamin] (1745-1813). A Plan for the Establishment of Public Schools and the Diffusion of Knowledge in Pennsylvania to which are added thoughts upon the mode of education, proper in a republic. Addressed to the Legislature and Citizens of the State (Philadelphia, PA: Ptd. for Thomas Dobson, 1786), 3-12. Rpt. in the Pennsylvania Gazette (Philadelphia, PA), no. 2919 (May 10, 1786): 1-2; and as “A Plan for Establishing Public Schools in Pennsylvania, and for conducting education agreeably to a Republican form of Government. Addressed to the Legislature and citizens of Pennsylvania, in the Year 1786.” In his Essays Literary, Moral and Philosophical (Philadelphia, PA: Thomas and Samuel F. Bradford, 1798), 1-6; 2nd ed. with additions (Philadelphia, PA: Thomas and Samuel F. Bradford, 1806), 1-6; rpt. ed. Michael Meranze (Schenectady, NY: Union College Press, 1988), 1-4. Also rpt. as “Education Agreeable to a Republican Form of Government.” In The Selected Writings of Benjamin Rush. Ed. Dagobert D. Runes (New York: Philosophical Library, 1947), 97-100. PSt

A detailed proposal for a eutopian public school system, saying that it supports religion, liberty, “just ideas of law and government,” manners, agriculture, and manufacturing (1). It then proposes one university in each state, located in its capital. For Pennsylvania he proposes four colleges in Philadelphia, Carlisle, Lancaster, “for the benefit of our German fellow citizens,” and one, in the future, in Pittsburg (2). Also, there should be a free school in every township where children learn to “read and write the English and German languages, and the use of figures” (2). Rush wrote numerous essays on aspects of education, including “Thoughts upon the Mode of Education proper in a Republic.” In his A Plan for the Establishment of Public Schools and the Diffusion of Knowledge in Pennsylvania to which are added thoughts upon the mode of education, proper in a republic. Addressed to the Legislature and Citizens of the State. Philadelphia, PA: Ptd. for Thomas Dobson, 1786), 13-36; “Thoughts upon Female Education, Accommodated to the Present State of Society, Manners, and Government, in the United States of America. Addressed to the Visitors of the Young Ladies Academy in Philadelphia, 28th July, 1787, at the Close of the Quarterly Examination, and Afterwards Published at the Request of the Visitors” his Essays Literary, Moral and Philosophical. (Philadelphia, PA: Thomas and Samuel F. Bradford, 1798), 75-92. 2nd ed. with additions (Philadelphia, PA: Thomas and Samuel F. Bradford, 1806), 75-92. Rpt. ed. Michael Meranze (Schenectady, NY: Union College Press, 1988), 44-54; “An Enquiry into the Utility of a Knowledge of the Latin and Greek Languages, as a branch of liberal education, with hints of a plan of liberal instruction, without them, accommodated to the present state of society, manners, and government in the United States.” By a Citizen of Philadelphia [pseud.]. American Museum, or Universal Magazine 5 (June 1789): 525-35; “Plan for a Federal University.” By Citizen of Pennsylvania [pseud.]. Federal Gazette and Philadelphia Evening Post, no. 25 (October 29, 1788): 2-3; and “Letter to Richard Price May 15, 1786.” Letters of Benjamin Rush. Volume I: 1761-1792. Ed. L. H. Butterfield ([Philadelphia, PA]: The American Philosophical Society by Princeton University Press, 1951), 388-90.