The Struggle for Empire: A Story of the Year 2236

TitleThe Struggle for Empire: A Story of the Year 2236
Year for Search1900
AuthorsCole, Robert William (1869-1937)
Date Published1900
PublisherElliot Stock
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

The Anglo-Saxon race had absorbed the world with England and Germany dividing it up and the United States reunited with England. London is the capital of the solar system. New power sources and been discovered. The sciences and engineering are considered the only worthwhile subjects of study because they are “… the only subjects that gave an adequate return for the labour spent on them” (7). The study of the humanities has been abolished. Two classes–intellectuals and menials. Riots followed by a future war, with most of the novel on the war.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. in Political Future Fiction: Speculative and Counter-Factual Politics in Edwardian Fiction. Ed. Kate Macdonald. Volume 1 The Empire of the Future. Ed. Richard Bleiler (London: Chatto & Windus, 2013), 133-97, with Bleiler’s “Introduction to Cole’s The Struggle for Empire (107-31), “Contemporary Essays by Robert Cole and Others” (207-39), and “Editorial Notes” (245-49). 

Holding Institutions

L, O

Author Note

(1869-1937)

Full Text

1900 Cole, Robert William (1869-1937). The Struggle for Empire: A Story of the Year 2236. London: Elliot Stock. Rpt. in Political Future Fiction: Speculative and Counter-Factual Politics in Edwardian Fiction. Ed. Kate Macdonald. Volume 1 The Empire of the Future. Ed. Richard Bleiler (London: Chatto & Windus, 2013), 133-97, with Bleiler’s “Introduction to Cole’s The Struggle for Empire (107-31), “Contemporary Essays by Robert Cole and Others” (207-39), and “Editorial Notes” (245-49). L, O

The Anglo-Saxon race had absorbed the world with England and Germany dividing it up and the United States reunited with England. London is the capital of the solar system. New power sources and been discovered. The sciences and engineering are considered the only worthwhile subjects of study because they are “… the only subjects that gave an adequate return for the labour spent on them” (7). The study of the humanities has been abolished. Two classes–intellectuals and menials. Riots followed by a future war, with most of the novel on the war.