A Supplement to the History of Robinson Crusoe, Being the History of Crusonia, or Robinson Crusoe's Island, Down to the Present Time. Copied from a letter sent by Mr. Wishit, Captain of the Good-Intent, to an intelligent Friend in England, after being in a Storm in May, 1781 driven out of his course to the Said Island. Published by the said Gentleman, for the agreeable Perusal of Robinson Crusoe's Friends of all Sizes

TitleA Supplement to the History of Robinson Crusoe, Being the History of Crusonia, or Robinson Crusoe's Island, Down to the Present Time. Copied from a letter sent by Mr. Wishit, Captain of the Good-Intent, to an intelligent Friend in England, after being in a Storm in May, 1781 driven out of his course to the Said Island. Published by the said Gentleman, for the agreeable Perusal of Robinson Crusoe's Friends of all Sizes
Year for Search1782
Authors[Spence], [Thomas](1750-1814)
Volume / EditionNew ed.
Date Published1782
PublisherT. Saint
Place PublishedNewcastle upon Tyne, Eng.
KeywordsEnglish author, Male author
Annotation

Eutopia. Robinson Crusoe’s island had developed the institutions found in Britain at the time, but a revolution had overthrown the system, abolished all landlords except the local parish, and established majority rule and a citizen’s militia. See also 1795, 1798 and 1801 Spence.

Additional Publishers

Also in Spence’s phonetic spelling in the same volume. The standard version is rpt. in The Political Works of Thomas Spence. Ed. H. T. Dickinson (Newcastle upon Tyne, Eng.: Avero (Eighteenth-Century) Publications Ltd., 1982), 5-15; and in Modern British Utopias 1700-1850. Ed. Gregory Claeys. 8 vols. (London: Pickering & Chatto, 1997), 4: 105-20.

Info Notes

Holding Institutions

L, VUW

Author Note

(1750-1814)

Full Text

1782 [Spence, Thomas] (1750-1814). A Supplement to the History of Robinson Crusoe, Being the History of Crusonia, or Robinson Crusoe’s Island, Down to the Present Time. Copied from a letter sent by Mr. Wishit, Captain of the Good-Intent, to an intelligent Friend in England, after being in a Storm in May, 1781 driven out of his course to the Said Island. Published by the said Gentleman, for the agreeable Perusal of Robinson Crusoe’s Friends of all Sizes. New ed. Newcastle upon Tyne, Eng.: T. Saint. Also in Spence’s phonetic spelling in the same volume. The standard version is rpt. in The Political Works of Thomas Spence. Ed. H. T. Dickinson (Newcastle upon Tyne, Eng.: Avero (Eighteenth-Century) Publications Ltd., 1982), 5-15; and in Modern British Utopias 1700-1850. Ed. Gregory Claeys. 8 vols. (London: Pickering & Chatto, 1997), 4: 105-20. L, VUW

Eutopia. Robinson Crusoe’s island had developed the institutions found in Britain at the time, but a revolution had overthrown the system, abolished all landlords except the local parish, and established majority rule and a citizen’s militia. See also 1795, 1798 and 1801 Spence.