The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

TitleThe Wonderful Wizard of Oz
Year for Search1900
AuthorsBaum, L[yman](1856-1919)
Tertiary AuthorsBaum, L. Frank
Date Published1900
PublisherG.M. Hill
Place PublishedChicago, IL
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

Classic U. S. children’s book that was followed by thirteen others, including The Marvellous Land of Oz: being an account of the further adventures of the Scarecrow and Tim Woodman and also the strange experiences of the Highly Magnified Woggle-Bug, Jack Pumpkinhead, the Animated Saw-Horse and the Gump: the story being A Sequel to the Wizard of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill with end papers from life poses by the famous comedians, Montgomery and Stone. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1904; Ozma of Oz: A Record of her Adventures with Dorothy Gale of Kansas, the Yellow Hen, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, Tik-Tok, the Cowardly Lion and the Hungry Tiger; Besides Other Good People too Numerous to Mention Faithfully Recorded Herein. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1907; Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1908; The Road to Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1909; The Emerald City of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1910; The Patchwork Girl of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1913; Tik-Tok of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1914; The Scarecrow of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Lee Co., 1915; Rinkitink in Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Lee Co., 1916; The Lost Princess of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Lee Co., 1917; The Tin Woodman of Oz: A Faithful Story of the Astonishing Adventure Undertaken by the Tin Woodman, Assisted by Woot the Wanderer, the Scarecrow of Oz and Polychrome, the Rainbow’s Daughter. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Lee Co., 1918; The Magic of Oz: A Faithful Record of the Remarkable Adventures of Dorothy and Trot and the Wizard of Oz, together with the Cowardly Lion, the Hungry Tiger and Cap’n Bill, in their successful search for a Magical and Beautiful Birthday Present for Princess Ozma of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Rand McNally Co., 1919; and Glinda of Oz: in which are related the Exciting Experiences of Princess Ozma of Oz, and Dorothy, in their hazardous journey to the home of the Flatheads, and to the Magic Isle of the Skeezers, and how they were rescued from dire peril by the sorcery of Glinda the Good. Illus. John R. Neill. Mattituck, NY: Ameron House, 1920. The first book is borderline as a utopia, but it has been treated as such; see Edward Wagenknecht, Utopia Americana. Seattle: University of Washington Bookstore, 1929; S. J. Sackett, “The Utopia of Oz.” Georgia Review 14 (Fall 1960): 275-91; and Andrew Karp, “Utopian Tension in L. Frank Baum’s Oz.” Utopian Studies 9.2 (1998): 103-21. Later volumes, beginning with The Emerald City of Oz, are  primarily adventure novels but have utopian elements and Ozma of Oz has elements of a Cockaigne, such as a Lunch Box Tree and a Dinner Pail Tree. After Baum’s death, Ruth Plumly Thompson (1891-1976) was hired to write sequels. She wrote twenty-one additional Oz books between 1921 and 1976, although the first, The Royal Book of Oz, was credited to Baum. 

Additional Publishers

Rpt. as The Wonderful Wizard of Oz with Pictures by W[illiam] W[inslow] Denslow. Ed. Susan Wolstenholme Oxford, Eng.: 1997), 1-263, with an “Introduction” (ix-xliii), “Note on the Text” (xliv-xlvi), “Select Bibliography” (xlvii-l), “A Chronology of L. Frank Baum” (li-lv), and “Explanatory Notes” (265-74); and in The Wonderful World of Oz. The Wizard of Ox The Emerald City of Oz Glinda of Oz. Ed. Jack Zipes (London: Penguin Books, 1998), 1-105 with an “Introduction” (ix-xxix), “Suggestions for Further Reading” (xxxi-xxxvii), “A Note on the Texts and he Illustrators” (xxxix-xli), and “Explanatory Notes” (359-77). For a critical ed., see The Annotated Wizard of Oz. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz By L. Frank Baum. Ed. Michael Patrick Hearn. Illus. W. W. Denslow. New York: Clarkson N. Potter, 1973; Centennial ed. New York: W. W. Norton, 2000, with a “Preface” by Martin Gardner (xi-xii).  

Info Notes

A musical was produced in 1902 and a famous film was released in 1939 directed by Victor Lonzo Fleming (1889-1949) and five uncredited directors with a screenplay by Noel Langley (1911-80), Florence Ryerson (1892-1965), Edgar Allan Woolf (1881-1943) and seventeen uncredited authors. For the screenplay, see Noel Langley, Florence Ryerson, and Edgar Allan Woolf. The Wizard of Oz: The Screenplay. Published by arrangement with Turner Entertainment Co. From the Book by L. Frank Baum. Ed. Michael Patrick Hearn. New York: Delta, 1989The Wizard of Oz. illus. Robert Leydenfrost. New York: Nelson Doubleday, 1978 has stills from the movie and an “Introduction” (vii-x) by Ray Bolger (1904-87), who played the Scarecrow in the film.

Illustration

Illus. W[illiam] W[allace] Denslow. The other books in the series were illus. John R. Neill.

Holding Institutions

Hathi

Author Note

(1856-1919)

Full Text

1900 Baum, L[yman] Frank (1856-1919). The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Illus. W[illiam] W[allace] Denslow  (1856-1915). Chicago, IL: G. M. Hill. Rpt. as The Wonderful Wizard of Oz with Pictures by W[illiam] W[inslow] Denslow. Ed. Susan Wolstenholme Oxford, Eng.: 1997), 1-263, with an “Introduction” (ix-xliii), “Note on the Text” (xliv-xlvi), “Select Bibliography” (xlvii-l), “A Chronology of L. Frank Baum” (li-lv), and “Explanatory Notes” (265-74); and in The Wonderful World of Oz. The Wizard of Ox The Emerald City of Oz Glinda of Oz. Ed. Jack Zipes (London: Penguin Books, 1998), 1-105 with an “Introduction” (ix-xxix), “Suggestions for Further Reading” (xxxi-xxxvii), “A Note on the Texts and he Illustrators” (xxxix-xli), and “Explanatory Notes” (359-77). For a critical ed., see The Annotated Wizard of Oz. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz By L. Frank Baum. Ed. Michael Patrick Hearn. Illus. W. W. Denslow. New York: Clarkson N. Potter, 1973; Centennial ed. New York: W. W. Norton, 2000, with a “Preface” by Martin Gardner (xi-xii). A musical was produced in 1902 and a famous film was released in 1939 directed by Victor Lonzo Fleming (1889-1949) and five uncredited directors with a screenplay by Noel Langley (1911-80), Florence Ryerson (1892-1965), Edgar Allan Woolf (1881-1943) and seventeen uncredited authors. For the screenplay, see Noel Langley, Florence Ryerson, and Edgar Allan Woolf. The Wizard of Oz: The Screenplay. Published by arrangement with Turner Entertainment Co. From the Book by L. Frank Baum. Ed. Michael Patrick Hearn. New York: Delta, 1989. The Wizard of Oz. illus. Robert Leydenfrost. New York: Nelson Doubleday, 1978 has stills from the movie and an “Introduction” (vii-x) by Ray Bolger (1904-87), who played the Scarecrow in the film. Hathi

Classic U. S. children’s book that was followed by thirteen others, including The Marvellous Land of Oz: being an account of the further adventures of the Scarecrow and Tim Woodman and also the strange experiences of the Highly Magnified Woggle-Bug, Jack Pumpkinhead, the Animated Saw-Horse and the Gump: the story being A Sequel to the Wizard of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill (1877-1943) with end papers from life poses by the famous comedians, Montgomery and Stone. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1904; Ozma of Oz: A Record of her Adventures with Dorothy Gale of Kansas, the Yellow Hen, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, Tik-Tok, the Cowardly Lion and the Hungry Tiger; Besides Other Good People too Numerous to Mention Faithfully Recorded Herein. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1907; Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1908; The Road to Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1909; The Emerald City of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1910; rpt. in The Wonderful World of Oz. The Wizard of Ox The Emerald City of Oz Glinda of Oz. Ed. Jack Zipes (London: Penguin Books, 1998), 107-251 with an “Introduction” (ix-xxix), “Suggestions for Further Reading” (xxxi-xxxvii), “A Note on the Texts and he Illustrators” (xxxix-xli), and “Explanatory Notes” (378-86). The Patchwork Girl of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1913; Tik-Tok of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Britton Co., 1914; The Scarecrow of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Lee Co., 1915; Rinkitink in Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Lee Co., 1916; The Lost Princess of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Lee Co., 1917; The Tin Woodman of Oz: A Faithful Story of the Astonishing Adventure Undertaken by the Tin Woodman, Assisted by Woot the Wanderer, the Scarecrow of Oz and Polychrome, the Rainbow’s Daughter. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Reilly & Lee Co., 1918; The Magic of Oz: A Faithful Record of the Remarkable Adventures of Dorothy and Trot and the Wizard of Oz, together with the Cowardly Lion, the Hungry Tiger and Cap’n Bill, in their successful search for a Magical and Beautiful Birthday Present for Princess Ozma of Oz. Illus. John R. Neill. Chicago, IL: The Rand McNally Co., 1919; and Glinda of Oz: in which are related the Exciting Experiences of Princess Ozma of Oz, and Dorothy, in their hazardous journey to the home of the Flatheads, and to the Magic Isle of the Skeezers, and how they were rescued from dire peril by the sorcery of Glinda the Good. Illus. John R. Neill. Mattituck, NY: Ameron House, 1920; rpt. in The Wonderful World of Oz. The Wizard of Ox The Emerald City of Oz Glinda of Oz. Ed. Jack Zipes (London: Penguin Books, 1998), 253-357 with an “Introduction” (ix-xxix), “Suggestions for Further Reading” (xxxi-xxxvii), “A Note on the Texts and he Illustrators” (xxxix-xli), and “Explanatory Notes” (386-89). The first book is borderline as a utopia, but it has been treated as such; see Edward Wagenknecht, Utopia Americana. Seattle: University of Washington Bookstore, 1929; S. J. Sackett, “The Utopia of Oz.” Georgia Review 14 (Fall 1960): 275-91; and Andrew Karp, “Utopian Tension in L. Frank Baum’s Oz.” Utopian Studies 9.2 (1998): 103-21. Later volumes, beginning with The Emerald City of Oz, are  primarily adventure novels but have utopian elements and Ozma of Oz has elements of a Cockaigne, such as a Lunch Box Tree and a Dinner Pail Tree. After Baum’s death, Ruth Plumly Thompson (1891-1976) was hired to write sequels. She wrote twenty-one additional Oz books between 1921 and 1976, although the first, The Royal Book of Oz, was credited to Baum. . Other Oz novels were published and illustrated by both illustrators with Denslow publishing Denslow’s Scarecrow and Tin-Man (1904) and a comic strip “Scarecrow and Tin-Man” and Neill publishing The Wonder City of Oz (1940), The Scalawagons of Oz (1941), and Lucky Bucky of Oz (1942).