The Workingman's Paradise: An Australian Labour Novel

TitleThe Workingman's Paradise: An Australian Labour Novel
Year for Search1892
Authors[Lane], [William](1861-1917)
Tertiary AuthorsJohn Miller [pseud.]
Date Published1892
PublisherEdwards, Dunlop & Co
Place PublishedSydney, NSW, Australia
KeywordsAustralian author, Male author, UK author, US author
Annotation

Consistently treated as an early Australian utopia, probably because of its title, which is clearly ironic, but the novel does not fit any definition of utopia. Could be seen as describing Australia as a dystopia. The last page of the text (reproduced in the 1980 ed. on [78]) has an ad for a sequel that was never published, In New Australia: Being Nellie Lawton’s Diary of a Happier Life. By John Miller [pseud.] which will present the eutopia to be found in the New Australia Co-operative Settlement Association. See 1888 Lane.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. Sydney, NSW, Australia: Sydney University Press, 1980, with an “Introduction” by Michael Wilding ([9]-[79]). Another edition with title on the cover as The Workingman’s Paradise: An Historical Novel. Sydney, NSW, Australia: Cosme Publicity Co., 1948.

Pseudonym

By John Miller [pseud.]

Holding Institutions

A, M, PSt

Author Note

The author (1861-1917)  was born in England, moved to the U. S. at age sixteen, returned to England briefly in 1885, and moved to Australia the same year. He led the New Australia expedition to Paraguay in 1893 and returned to Australia in 1899.

Full Text

1892 [Lane, William] (1861-1917). The Workingman’s Paradise: An Australian Labour Novel. By John Miller [pseud.]. Sydney, NSW, Australia: Edwards, Dunlop & Co. Rpt. Sydney, NSW, Australia: Sydney University Press, 1980, with an “Introduction” by Michael Wilding ([9]-[79]). Another edition with title on the cover as The Workingman’s Paradise: An Historical Novel. Sydney, NSW, Australia: Cosme Publicity Co., 1948. A, M, PSt

Consistently treated as an early Australian utopia, probably because of its title, which is clearly ironic, but the novel does not fit any definition of utopia. Could be seen as describing Australia as a dystopia. The last page of the text (reproduced in the 1980 ed. on [78]) has an ad for a sequel that was never published, In New Australia: Being Nellie Lawton’s Diary of a Happier Life. By John Miller [pseud.] which will present the eutopia to be found in the New Australia Co-operative Settlement Association. See 1888 Lane. The author was born in England, moved to the U. S. at age sixteen, returned to England briefly in 1885, and moved to Australia the same year. He led the New Australia expedition to Paraguay in 1893 and returned to Australia in 1899.