The World Grown Young: Being a Brief Record of Reforms Carried Out From 1894-1914 By the Late Mr. Philip Adams Millionaire and Philanthropist

TitleThe World Grown Young: Being a Brief Record of Reforms Carried Out From 1894-1914 By the Late Mr. Philip Adams Millionaire and Philanthropist
Year for Search1892
AuthorsHerbert, William [pseud.]
Date Published[1892]
PublisherW.H. Allen
Place PublishedLondon
Annotation

Eutopia established within twenty years through the efforts of one man, a Mr. Adams, an inventor who so improves the railroads as to radically enhance the British economy. He then sets about to reform the political and social systems as well as rationalizing the economy. Most of the standard reforms of the day, such as universal conscription, free marriage and divorce, health care, and more sense in the legislature, are included. Travel eliminates ignorance and hatred.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. in Late Victorian Utopias: A Prospectus. Ed. Gregory Claeys. 6 vols. (London: Pickering & Chatto, 2009), 4: 3-161. Editor’s notes, 1: 421-22.

Pseudonym

William Herbert [pseud.]

Holding Institutions

L, O, PSt

Author Note

A number of libraries catalog this as by Herbert David Croly (1869-1930), but neither Claeys or I can find any justification for the attribution beyond the fact that Croly wrote one book under this pseudonym.

Full Text

[1892] Herbert, William [pseud.]. The World Grown Young: Being a Brief Record of Reforms Carried Out From 1894-1914 By the Late Mr. Philip Adams Millionaire and Philanthropist. London: W. H. Allen. Rpt. in Late Victorian Utopias: A Prospectus. Ed. Gregory Claeys. 6 vols. (London: Pickering & Chatto, 2009), 4: 3-161. Editor’s notes, 1: 421-22. A number of libraries catalog this as by Herbert David Croly (1869-1930), but neither Claeys or I can find any justification for the attribution beyond the fact that Croly wrote one book under this pseudonym. L, O, PSt

Eutopia established within twenty years through the efforts of one man, a Mr. Adams, an inventor who so improves the railroads as to radically enhance the British economy. He then sets about to reform the political and social systems as well as rationalizing the economy. Most of the standard reforms of the day, such as universal conscription, free marriage and divorce, health care, and more sense in the legislature, are included. Travel eliminates ignorance and hatred.