The Wreck of a World With a Preface by Sir John Brown, C.E., J.P. Knight of the Order of Maximilian of Mexico, etc., etc., etc.

TitleThe Wreck of a World With a Preface by Sir John Brown, C.E., J.P. Knight of the Order of Maximilian of Mexico, etc., etc., etc.
Year for Search1890
AuthorsGrove, W[illiam]
Tertiary AuthorsGrove, W.
Volume / Edition6th ed.
Date Published[1890]
PublisherDigby and Long, Publishers
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsMale author
Annotation

The novel starts in what is presented in the first chapter as a flawed utopia that is technologically advanced but beginning to lose its moral center. There is a Pan-Britannic Confederation with all members having a President and Congress and the nobility gradually disappearing. But much of the novel is concerned with the a revolt of the machines against the human race, which is almost eliminated. After a long conflict, humans win but are temporarily limited to one island where a small group begins to create a good society that is compared to More's Utopia. No money. Goods freely exchanged.

Additional Publishers

Long's Albion Library, Vol. II. This ed. rpt. in British Future Fiction. Ed. I.F. Clarke. 8 vols. (London: Pickering & Chatto, 2001), 3: 5-163, with a brief note by the editor (1-3). 1st ed. also 1890 with the same publisher. The English Catalogue lists the 1st ed. as February 1890, but, due to ads in the book dated 1889, I.F. Clarke's Tale of the Future and some other bibliographies give the publication date as 1889.

Holding Institutions

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Full Text

[1890] Grove, W[illiam]. The Wreck of a World With a Preface by Sir John Brown, C.E., J.P. Knight of the Order of Maximilian of Mexico, etc., etc., etc. 6th ed. London: Digby and Long, Publishers, 1890. Long's Albion Library, Vol. II. This ed. rpt. in British Future Fiction. Ed. I.F. Clarke. 8 vols. (London: Pickering & Chatto, 2001), 3: 5-163, with a brief note by the editor (1-3). 1st ed. also 1890 with the same publisher. The English Catalogue lists the 1st ed. as February 1890, but, due to ads in the book dated 1889, I.F. Clarke's The Tale of the Future and some other bibliographies give the publication date as 1889. L

The novel starts in what is presented in the first chapter as a flawed utopia that is technologically advanced but beginning to lose its moral center. There is a Pan-Britannic Confederation with all members having a President and Congress and the nobility gradually disappearing. But much of the novel is concerned with the a revolt of the machines against the human race, which is almost eliminated. After a long conflict, humans win but are temporarily limited to one island where a small group begins to create a good society that is compared to More’s Utopia. No money. Goods freely exchanged.