"The End of the World"

Title"The End of the World"
Year for Search1903
AuthorsNewcomb, Simon (1835-1909)
Secondary TitleMcClure's Magazine
Volume / Edition21.1
Pagination3-14
Date PublishedMay 1903
KeywordsCanadian author, Male author, US author
Annotation

A complacent eutopia with an easily enforced international law, little news, and one language is unable to respond to a potential catastrophe.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. in The Battle of the Monsters and Other Stories: An Anthology of American Science Fiction. Ed. David G. Hartwell and L[loyd] W. Currey (Boston, MA: Gregg Press, 1976), 181-95; in Visions From the Edge: An Anthology of Atlantic Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy. Ed. John Bell and Lesley Choyce (Porters Lake, NS, Canada: Pottersfield Press, 1981), 34-44 with an editor’s note on 33; and The End of the World and Other Catastrophes. Ed. Mike [Michael Raymond Donald] Ashley (London: British Library, 2019), 151-68, with an editor’s note on 149

Holding Institutions

Can, PSt

Author Note

The author (1835-1909) was born in Canada and moved to the U. S. in 1853 where he became a professor at Johns Hopkins University and a Rear Admiral in the U. S. Navy. See also 1900 Newcomb.

Full Text

1903 Newcomb, Simon (1835-1909). “The End of the World.” McClure’s Magazine 21.1 (May 1903): 3-14. Rpt. in The Battle of the Monsters and Other Stories: An Anthology of American Science Fiction. Ed. David G. Hartwell and L[loyd] W. Currey (Boston, MA: Gregg Press, 1976), 181-95; in Visions From the Edge: An Anthology of Atlantic Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy. Ed. John Bell and Lesley Choyce (Porters Lake, NS, Canada: Pottersfield Press, 1981), 34-44 with an editor’s note on 33; and The End of the World and Other Catastrophes. Ed. Mike [Michael Raymond Donald] Ashley (London: British Library, 2019), 151-68, with an editor’s note on 149. Can, PSt

A complacent eutopia with an easily enforced international law, little news, and one language is unable to respond to a potential catastrophe. The author was born in Canada and moved to the U. S. in 1853 where he became a professor at Johns Hopkins University and a Rear Admiral in the U. S. Navy. See also 1900 Newcomb.