Equality

TitleEquality
Year for Search1897
AuthorsBellamy, Edward(1850-98)
Date Published1897
PublisherD. Appleton
Place PublishedNew York
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

Expansion and modification of the ideas found in his 1888 Looking Backward. The most significant changes are in women’s position, which is now clearly equal to men, and in the political system, which is international and much more democratic, including, in many circumstances direct votes by the people. Considerably more on the nineteenth-century and on the revolution. After publishing Looking Backward Bellamy became a social reformer and was involved with two journals, The Nationalist (1889-91) and The New Nation (1891-94), which he edited and published, and wrote many essays defending or elaborating his position; some of these have been collected in his Edward Bellamy Speaks Again! Articles--Public Addresses--Letters. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1937. 2nd ed. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1938; and Talks On Nationalism. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1938. 1889 Bellamy, “With Eyes Shut,” and 1891 and 1895 Bellamy are set in the same eutopia. Utopias not directly connected to Looking Backward are 1886 Bellamy and 1889 Bellamy, “To Whom This May Come.”

Additional Publishers

Rpt. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Gregg Press, 1968; New York: Greenwood Press, 1969; and New York: AMS Press, 1970. Chapter 23 was often reprinted as The Parable of the Water Tank.

Holding Institutions

MoU-St, PSt, W3,459

Author Note

(1850-98)

Full Text

1897 Bellamy, Edward (1850-98). Equality. New York: D. Appleton. 2nd ed. New York: D. Appleton, 1897. Canadian ed. Toronto, ON, Canada: George N. Morang, 1897. First ed. rpt. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Gregg Press, 1968; New York: Greenwood Press, 1969; and New York: AMS Press, 1970. Chapter 23 was often reprinted as The Parable of the Water Tank. MoU-St, PSt, W3,459

Expansion and modification of the ideas found in his 1888 Looking Backward. The most significant changes are in women’s position, which is now clearly equal to men, and in the political system, which is international and much more democratic, including, in many circumstances direct votes by the people. Considerably more on the nineteenth-century and on the revolution. After publishing Looking Backward Bellamy became a social reformer and was involved with two journals, The Nationalist (1889-91) and The New Nation (1891-94), which he edited and published, and wrote many essays defending or elaborating his position; some of these have been collected in his Edward Bellamy Speaks Again! Articles--Public Addresses--Letters. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1937. 2nd ed. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1938; and Talks On Nationalism. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1938. 1889 Bellamy, “With Eyes Shut,” and 1891 and 1895 Bellamy are set in the same eutopia. Utopias not directly connected to Looking Backward are 1886 Bellamy and 1889 Bellamy, “To Whom This May Come.”