Native Tongue II: The Judas Rose

TitleNative Tongue II: The Judas Rose
Year for Search1987
AuthorsElgin, [Patricia Anne] Suzette [Wilkins](1936-2015)
Tertiary AuthorsElgin, Suzette Haden
Date Published1987
PublisherDAW Books
Place PublishedNew York
KeywordsFemale author, US author
Annotation

Sequel to 1984 Elgin in which the women’s plan to teach more women the women’s language is complicated by the presence of aliens on Earth and the infiltration of their movement by a woman at the instigation of the men. The aliens note that Earth women are ready to move onto a higher stage of civilization but that the me are not. 

Additional Publishers

Rpt. as Native Tongue 2: The Judas Rose. New York: The Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 2002 with “Afterword Gender, Technology, and Violence” by Susan M. Squier and Julie Vedder on 365-80.

Info Notes

See also her A First Dictionary and Grammar of Láadan. Madison, WI: Society for the Furtherance and Study of Fantasy and Science Fiction, 1985. Rev. as A First Dictionary and Grammar of Láadan. 2nd ed. Ed. Diane Martin. Madison, WI: Society for the Furtherance and Study of Fantasy and Science Fiction, 1988

Author Note

The female author (1936-2015) held a doctorate in linguistics from the University of California, San Diego and wrote extensively on the subject.

Full Text

1987 Elgin, [Patricia Anne] Suzette [Wilkins] (1936-2015). Native Tongue II: The Judas Rose. By Suzette Haden Elgin. New York: DAW Books. Rpt. as Native Tongue 2: The Judas Rose. New York: The Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 2002 with “Afterword Gender, Technology, and Violence” by Susan M. Squier and Julie Vedder on 365-80. PSt

Sequel to 1984 Elgin in which the women’s plan to teach more women the women’s language is complicated by the presence of aliens on Earth and the infiltration of their movement by a woman at the instigation of the men. The aliens note that Earth women are ready to move onto a higher stage of civilization but that the me are not. See also 1994 Elgin. The female author held a doctorate in linguistics from the University of California, San Diego and wrote extensively on the subject.